Knowledge

Walk along with science. Find out about new discoveries and applications.

Detecting Sperm on Washed Textiles

Application note on light microscopy in forensic analyses

Fluorescent sperm cells imaged with light microscopy

The forensic testing of DNA samples is an important part of day-to-day forensic activities. Often, weeks or months pass between the committing of a crime and the analysis of the evidence by forensic geneticists, and  during which time evidence relevant to the crime is washed. This study shows that even after two washing cycles at a water temperature of 60 °C, a sufficient number of sperm cells can still be detected to be used to create a genetic fingerprint.


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Correlative Microscopy in Materials Science (Second Edition)

ZEISS & Wiley present free guide

Correlative Microscopy in Materials Science by Wiley

Correlative microscopy allows scientists to study a greater diversity of samples, as some microscopy techniques work better with some materials than others, and to generate a much greater range of information about those samples at various different scales.

The second edition of this Essential Knowledge Briefing (EKB) offers an introduction to correlative microscopy: different techniques, specific benefit, and combinations scientists tend to employ for studying non-biological materials. There are also several case studies detailing specific examples of how scientists have applied correlative microscopy and what it has allowed them to discover.


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Live-Webinar: Battery Research With Advanced Microscopy and Image Processing

From Sample Preparation to 3D Reconstruction and Quantification

Battery Research

In this webinar Stefanie Freitag from ZEISS will first give an introduction about existing advanced microscopic techniques for battery research including the presentation of possibilities for in-situ observations. In the second part Dr. Jochen Joos from KIT will explain his established workflow from sample preparation to 3D reconstruction and describe hurdles and solutions concerning image processing.

Thursday, 21 March 2019 | 4 p.m. (CET)


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What Do Metallographers Actually Do?

The microscope as the most important tool

Toni Vegaz Nguyen, who himself trained as a metallographer at the Lette Verein Berlin, explains what a metallographer does, why he needs microscopes for it.

Metallographers mainly deal with the microstructure of materials and contribute to quality assurance. This also includes mechanical-technological and non-destructive material testing, material development, and research of high-quality materials as well as damage analysis.


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A Magical Formula for Neuron Detection?

Leveraging ZEISS ZEN Intellesis and the digital microscopy platform APEER to automate segmentation workflows

Neuron Segmentation Workflow

Making sense of your imaging data traditionally was and mostly still is a tedious process. One of the baselines of any neuroscientific research: Neuron detection and segmentation. Whether you are aiming to map brain structures in 3D, find out about the wiring of different parts of the brain or understand the defects diseases like Alzheimer’s are causing within the brain structures – it all starts with neuron detection and segmentation.
Only with a good segmentation in your hands, the extraction of relevant statistical data becomes possible.


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A Journey Into a Human Kidney

ZEISS microscopes help uncover centuries old hidden secrets of human kidney stones

Kidney stones, the painful urinary deposits that affect more than 10 percent of people worldwide, are surprisingly dynamic, forming much like microscopic coral reefs, according to new research that could provide insights into how to better diagnose and treat the condition.


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The Solar Cells of the Future

Oak Ridge National Labs researchers use ZEISS ORION NanoFab SIMS to characterize perovskite photovoltaic films

Perovskite solar cells

Solar cells made out of a perovskite-structured compound are the fastest-growing solar technology to date. Compared to traditional silicon solar cells, the raw materials used are cheap to produce, simple to manufacture, and their efficiencies are very high making them commercially attractive and a very promising material for high-efficiency optoelectronic applications. Very recently, researchers from the US Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee have employed a unique combination of imaging and characterization tools and atomic-level simulations to solve a longstanding debate about the internal structure of these fascinating materials.


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Efficient Microstructure Characterization of Metals Using Light Microscopy

Your questions answered

Microstructure of Material

A material’s properties are strongly linked to its microstructure, such as grain size, porosity, phase and non-metallic inclusions. Light microscopy is a powerful tool for evaluating a material’s microstructure, but extracting meaningful results using traditional image analysis can be challenging.

In a recent SelectScience® webinar, Tim Schubert, materials scientists at the Materials Research Institute Aalen (IMFAA), Aalen University, and Torben Wulff, solutions manager light microscopy at ZEISS Research Microscopy Solutions, introduce a new comprehensive solution for microstructure analysis and present standardized techniques for metallography investigation.


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Organizing and Managing Digital Classrooms Efficiently

New software module ZEISS Labscope Teacher

ZEISS Labscope Teacher

The powerful new software module ZEISS Labscope Teacher expands the existing ZEISS Labscope installation. It puts the lecturer in charge of all connected microscopes in the network of the digital classroom while they move freely around the classroom. It lets the teacher define working groups, send group-specific tasks, and share digital information such as documents or presentations, thereby fostering teamwork. The master device makes it easy to keep everybody on track. The lecturer only needs to define the classroom layout once. Simple reloading to start the lesson saves valuable teaching time.


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ZEISS Laser Manipulation System Based on Nobel Prize-Winning “Optical Tweezer” Technology

Using light to capture and manipulate tiny objects

PALM CombiSystem

The 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Arthur Ashkin of the United States for his work on transforming laser light into miniature tools. Based on this technology, ZEISS has developed PALM MicroTweezers – an optical tweezers system that allows precise, contact-free cell manipulation as well as the trapping, moving, and sorting of microscopic particles such as beads or even subcellular particles.


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