Customer Story

How do ZEISS microscopes contribute to solving major future questions of mankind? Explore fascinating stories from our customers.

“Without microscopes, restorers would be blind.”

Hermitage Deputy Director and Chief Curator Svetlana B. Adaksina shares some insights

Svetlana B. Adaksina at the Art of Restoration conference

The Art of Restoration conference took place at the world famous State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg in May 2019. The conference was organized for the second time by Hermitage and OPTEC ZEISS Group/ZEISS Research Microscopy Solutions.

We spoke to Hermitage Deputy Director and Chief Curator Svetlana B. Adaksina about the conference, restoring Cultural Heritage, and the cooperation with ZEISS.


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The Natural History Museum London – Behind the scenes 3

Conserving and digitizing butterflies

ZEISS Axiozoom V.16 helps to repair butterfly wings.

There is more to an exhibition than what is on display. A lot of a museum’s treasures are behind the scenes and require constant maintenance and protection. There are various materials that are subject to conservation, restoration, and digitization, including textile, paper, books, glass, ceramics, paintings, wood, metals, skeletons, and whole animals.


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The Natural History Museum London – Behind the scenes 2

Making the invisible tangible

A high-resolution 3D model of a dinosaur skull

The “Make it visible” project at the Natural History Museum (NHM) London aims to give blind and partially sighted visitors a chance to experience the beauty of nature shown in the exhibition. With the help of microscopes, natural history themed samples are printed in 3D to be used for public outreach activities – which include exhibitions, public and school events.


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The Natural History Museum London – Behind the scenes 1

From mosquito DNA to Martian meteorites

Facilities of the Natural History Museum London

The Natural History Museum (NHM) in London is not only a world-famous museum with around 5 million visitors per year, but also a world leading research institution with more than 350 scientists in earth and life sciences working on major scientific questions about our past and our future.


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Meteorite hides a fragment of an ancient comet

Surprise discovered by ZEISS microscopes

The lucky pathway of LaPaz 02342 xenolith from a disrupted comet

A tiny piece of the building blocks from which comets form has been found inside a primitive meteorite that broke away from an asteroid. The rare discovery provides a critical insight into the formation of the solar system over 4.5 billion years ago, and how it evolved into what we see today. In a study published in Nature Astronomy, scientists were analyzing a meteorite called LaPaz Icefield 02342, which was found in Antarctica in 2002.


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“The hydrogen era is yet to come”

The role of fuel cells in the energy transition

Analyzing the microstructure of fuel cells

Fuel cells generate electricity emission-free and could therefore play a crucial role in all areas of energy supply in future. Professor Ellen Ivers-Tiffée and Dr. André Weber from the Institute for Applied Materials – Materials of Electrical Engineering (IAM-WET) at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are working on the optimization of these fuel cells. For more than 20 years, they have studied electrochemical energy conversion.


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Why do dopamine neurons die particularly fast in a specific brain area?

Research team from York uses confocal microscopy from ZEISS to investigate neurodegeneration processes in Parkinson’s disease

Dopamine neurons under the confocal microscope

A key question in Parkinson’s disease is why dopamine neurons die particularly fast in a specific area of the midbrain. In a recent paper, a research team from the University of York studied Drosophila neurons using ZEISS LSM 780 in the Bioscience Technology Facility to investigate basic processes of this neurodegenerative disease. They proposed that variations in the expression of a specific protein contribute to differences in neurodegeneration seen in Parkinson’s disease.


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Spotlight on the cells’ ultrastructure

New correlative approach combines superresolution confocal and scanning electron imaging

The Radboundumc research team

Researchers from the Department of Cell Biology, theme Nanomedicine, and the ‘Microscopy Imaging Center’ at the Radboudumc in Nijmegen, Netherlands recently developed and optimized a pipeline for correlative imaging using superresolution (SR) microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study the cellular ultrastructure.


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The lamprey regenerates its spinal cord not just once – but twice

Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) scientists determine central nervous system regeneration with ZEISS microscopes

Lamprey spinal cord

The eel-like lamprey can fully regenerate its spinal cord even after it’s been severed. In a new study, Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) scientists report that lampreys recover and regenerate just as impressively after a second complete spinal cord injury at the same location. A recent study by Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) scientists opens up a new path for identifying pro-regenerative molecules and potential therapeutic targets for human spinal cord injury.


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How can toothbrush and toothpaste be a perfect match?

APEER helps to analyze all imaging data and unveils new perspectives

Professor Ralf Wehrspohn, Director of the Fraunhofer Institute for Microstructure of Materials and Systems IMWS

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Microstructure of Materials and Systems IMWS in the German city of Halle investigate the interactions between teeth and various dental care products. With APEER they can now analyze and correlate all data and gain new insights.


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