Customer Story

How do ZEISS microscopes contribute to solving major future questions of mankind? Explore fascinating stories from our customers.

Why do dopamine neurons die particularly fast in a specific brain area?

Research team from York uses confocal microscopy from ZEISS to investigate neurodegeneration processes in Parkinson’s disease

Dopamine neurons under the confocal microscope

A key question in Parkinson’s disease is why dopamine neurons die particularly fast in a specific area of the midbrain. In a recent paper, a research team from the University of York studied Drosophila neurons using ZEISS LSM 780 in the Bioscience Technology Facility to investigate basic processes of this neurodegenerative disease. They proposed that variations in the expression of a specific protein contribute to differences in neurodegeneration seen in Parkinson’s disease.


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Spotlight on the cells’ ultrastructure

New correlative approach combines superresolution confocal and scanning electron imaging

The Radboundumc research team

Researchers from the Department of Cell Biology, theme Nanomedicine, and the ‘Microscopy Imaging Center’ at the Radboudumc in Nijmegen, Netherlands recently developed and optimized a pipeline for correlative imaging using superresolution (SR) microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study the cellular ultrastructure.


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The lamprey regenerates its spinal cord not just once – but twice

Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) scientists determine central nervous system regeneration with ZEISS microscopes

Lamprey spinal cord

The eel-like lamprey can fully regenerate its spinal cord even after it’s been severed. In a new study, Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) scientists report that lampreys recover and regenerate just as impressively after a second complete spinal cord injury at the same location. A recent study by Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) scientists opens up a new path for identifying pro-regenerative molecules and potential therapeutic targets for human spinal cord injury.


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How can toothbrush and toothpaste be a perfect match?

APEER helps to analyze all imaging data and unveils new perspectives

Professor Ralf Wehrspohn, Director of the Fraunhofer Institute for Microstructure of Materials and Systems IMWS

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Microstructure of Materials and Systems IMWS in the German city of Halle investigate the interactions between teeth and various dental care products. With APEER they can now analyze and correlate all data and gain new insights.


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“The main goal of my research is to set up screening clinics throughout the developing world”

Johns Hopkins researcher Dr Saraswati Sukumar gives an insight into her work on breast cancer

araswati Sukumar - Johns Hopkins Medicine

Focusing on breast cancer, Dr Saraswati Sukumar’s research aims to improve early detection and therefore save patients the difficulties associated with treatment. In this short interview, the Johns Hopkins Medicine researcher describes the progress of her research, as well as the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead.


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A journey into a human kidney

ZEISS microscopes help uncover centuries old hidden secrets of human kidney stones

Kidney stones, the painful urinary deposits that affect more than 10 percent of people worldwide, are surprisingly dynamic, forming much like microscopic coral reefs, according to new research that could provide insights into how to better diagnose and treat the condition.


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1st prize for microscopic image of blood clot

Eli Moore is the winner of the University of South Australia’s Images of Research Competition 2018

“Clotted” by Dr Eli Moore - 1st prize winner of UniSA’s Images of Research Photography Competition
This image called “Clotted” won the 1st prize in this year’s Images of Research Photography Competition run by the University of South Australia (UniSA). It reveals the microscopic landscape of a blood clot caused by a medical device designed to treat aspects of cardiovascular disease.


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The solar cells of the future

Oak Ridge National Labs researchers use ZEISS ORION NanoFab SIMS to characterize perovskite photovoltaic films

Perovskite solar cells

Solar cells made out of a perovskite-structured compound are the fastest-growing solar technology to date. Compared to traditional silicon solar cells, the raw materials used are cheap to produce, simple to manufacture, and their efficiencies are very high making them commercially attractive and a very promising material for high-efficiency optoelectronic applications. Very recently, researchers from the US Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee have employed a unique combination of imaging and characterization tools and atomic-level simulations to solve a longstanding debate about the internal structure of these fascinating materials.


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Rice Rice Baby!

Agricultural research using X-ray microscopy

imaging result of rice flower

In order to identify the structural differences between rice varieties and different parts, microscopic observation is necessary. ZEISS X-ray microscopy enables researchers to observe the inner structure with a 3D non-destructive method, which provides a new tool for rice and other agricultural research. In order to develop the application of X-ray microscopy with rice, the Shanghai Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology, SIBS, CAS and ZEISS cooperated on the imaging study of rice samples.


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Discovery in telomere biology advances understanding of cancer, ageing and heart disease

ZEISS Airyscan technology helps to reveal telomere structure

A team of Sydney scientists – including Katharina Gaus from University of New South Wales (UNSW) – have made a groundbreaking discovery in telomere biology with implications for conditions ranging from cancer to ageing and heart disease. The unique area detector technology of ZEISS LSM 880 with Airyscan made it possible to image telomere structures.


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