Practical Experiments for Education in Biology

University of Jena and ZEISS publish microscopy booklet for students and prospective teachers

Together with the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany, ZEISS has put together a microscopy manual for students and (future) teachers. The booklet contains practical experiments for education in biology. The English version is now available free of charge and can be downloaded here.

The co-initiator is Prof. Uwe Hossfeld, who has been advocating the teaching concept of practice-oriented research teaching and learning in biology for years.

Microscopy is an essential skill that biology teachers should master. In addition, students cannot only explore a whole new world in microscopy, but also train their skills and learn to deal with biological problems in a different way.

The fact that microscopy only appears as a peripheral area in the Thuringian curricula is a pity, especially with regard to the location. Precisely because we have ZEISS, one of the leading manufacturers of microscope systems here in Jena, it only makes sense to work together and update the current state of the art work with new findings from science and education to unite.

Prof. Uwe Hossfeld, University of Jena

To bring readers up to date, the first part of the booklet focuses on the basics of modern microscopes and how they work. The second part is followed by instructions for sample preparation, microscopic drawings and selected experiments.

The manual is suitable for beginners and specialists alike. A new element is the integration of modern technologies such as smartphone apps. This allows images from the integrated microscope camera to be transferred wirelessly to the display of a mobile phone and further processed there.

Download the free guide “Microscopy for Biology Education. Practical Experiments for Education in Biology”

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ZEISS Digital Classrooms at Universities

Interactive techniques for classroom experiments and rehearsals may upgrade your university

Microscopy is an essential part of the life and earth sciences at universities. Students use microscopes to gain deeper insight into preparing and examining human, animal or plant cells. For this, they need various microscopy techniques and software for image acquisition and documentation in their lectures. And this is where the Digital Classroom comes into play: connected ZEISS microscopes, the ZEISS imaging software Labscope and digital equipment such as tablets enable an interactive approach to learning and create a motivating and engaging atmosphere for students. They are also inspired by the possibility of working with the tools they use in their everyday lives at university.

The Digital Classroom provides a new learning and teaching experience.

Dynamic learning and teaching

Teachers can walk through the classroom and give real-time feedback while students can share what they are looking at with their classmates and explore their samples together. While the microscopic image is shared via WiFi or projected on a large screen, findings can be jointly discussed. Furthermore, teachers get the chance to point their students toward tiny structures and interesting details they might not yet have seen using the Pointer function in ZEISS Labscope.

Improving the quality of teaching

The interactive classroom offers me and the university a chance of giving a good educational experience to our students, e.g. we can project an image the student is seeing onto a screen. That way everyone can see this microscopic image. On the other hand I can constantly see what the students are seeing on my tablet. This allows me to help them even more.

Dr. Mark Ramsdale, the Director of Education at the Department of Biosciences at the University of Exeter, UK

Universities depend on student fees and funding – both being increasingly related to excellence in education, student’s choices and rankings. Offering information is not enough anymore – universities need to offer a vision how to engage, involve and reach students. “Both teaching and learning are much more fun in this environment. And when learning is fun, our students get better results and that’s what our university wants”, says Ramsey.

Gain more insights into Digital Classroom learning at the University of Exeter:

More information on the ZEISS Digital Classroom

More information on ZEISS Labscope

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A Digital Classroom at the International Garden Exhibition in Berlin

School classes analyze water samples with ZEISS microscopes

A recently equipped digital classroom at the IGA campus in Berlin supports students in environmental education. With the IGA campus and the newly built environmental education centre, the IGA is focusing on encouraging the learning through play of children and young people and allowing people of all ages to experience nature in an active way.

Analysing water quality

A laboratory with 28 networked ZEISS Primo Star and Stemi 305 microscopes, as well as accessories such as cameras, enables interactive learning. From a raft on the Wuhleteich, a small pond nearby, school classes take water samples, carry out initial experiments there and then analyse the water samples in the new environmental education center. In the digital classroom, students determine the water quality and learn about the water flora and fauna. The live images of the connected microscopes can be transferred to the main display directly on an iPad, iPhone or via a projector to discuss in the group.

The IGA campus and the environmental education centre

The IGA campus is designed to be a place for learning, encountering and experimenting within the International Garden Exhibition 2017 (IGA) – a festival celebrating international garden design and green lifestyles in Berlin. Primarily conceived for teenagers and children, the IGA-classroom strives to integrate educational selections on urban gardening, development education, arts and media, and professional orientation. As a model location, the IGA campus lays the foundations for lasting environmental education in the district. In the 186 days of the international horticultural exhibition, more than 2,500 events invite guests to get actively involved, and discover and try out new things. “With the IGA campus and the environmental education centre, the international garden exhibition is a perfect place for green learning in Berlin, which will continue beyond the IGA,” says IGA Managing Director Katharina Lohmann.

More information about the Digital Classroom from ZEISS

More information about the IGA campus

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Bringing Classroom Learning to Life

ZEISS at The Big Bang Fair 2017

For the first time ever, ZEISS attended the UK Big Bang Young Scientists & Engineers Fair at Birmingham NEC. This is the largest celebration of science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) for young people in the UK, attracting up to 22,000 visitors each day and even coverage on the BBC. Watch the highlights video to catch up on all the action.

From robotics and drones to engineering for theme parks – the Big Bang Fair had it all. The event aimed to show young people the exciting opportunities available within STEM, by bringing classroom learning to life. ZEISS did exactly that by offering a fully-interactive showcase of the Digital Classroom solution, featuring nine digital microscopes each connected to an iPad and large screens.

With everything from live bugs, dissections of insects and iPhone circuit boards under the microscopes, students, parents and teachers alike were “wowed” by the interactive technology that ZEISS had to offer. The large screens drew thousands of aspiring scientists to the stand, each approaching the digital classroom with interest and intrigue. One teacher commented: “It’s equipment like this which is a long term investment in creating an active classroom for years to come” and one young student commented: “I like that my friends can see what I’m looking at, we can all talk about it and share what we think”.

A key benefit of the ZEISS Digital Classroom is that the teacher is able to move freely around the class whilst monitoring student microscope live views via their iPad. Students and teachers can also easily share their findings, take screenshots for portfolio evidence and even add annotations. All images can be shared among the network of iPads connected to the WiFi network. This allows students to be receive real-time feedback on their findings from their teachers and classmates.

The Big Bang Science Fair helped ZEISS to demonstrate to teachers how a Digital Classroom setup can help them to revolutionise the learning and teaching of STEM subjects for our scientists of tomorrow.

The show was a fantastic experience for all involved at ZEISS, and it was extremely rewarding to see the children get so excited about science under a microscope.

Tom Quick from ZEISS UK

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Successful DNA & Health Day at the Institute for Genomic Biology (IGB)

ZEISS supports Illinois I-STEM educational outreach event with classroom microscopes

Taking a break from their regular classes… and the gym, on February 22nd, 63 scholar-athletes from the Urbana High School boys’ and girls’ basketball teams visited the Institute for Genomic Biology (IGB) on campus to learn about DNA sciences during I-STEM’s DNA and Health Day. While learning about DNA and Health via a number of hands-on activities, they also got to interact with some Illinois researchers. During a tour of the IGB, they got hands-on experience with state-of-the-art ZEISS microscopes and cutting-edge technology.

According to Illinois researcher Bruce Fouke, DNA sciences have now been dubbed the “Omics.” What are “Omics?” Wiley’s online library defines them as the universal detection of genes (genomics), mRNA (transcriptomics), proteins (proteomics) and metabolites (metabolomics) in a specific biological sample. Why a DNA and Health Day?

[Omics are] absolutely fundamental to every single aspect of our daily lives. Everything from energy and the environment, to health care, and even space exploration are all fully dependent on the application of Omics sciences. Every future health care decision that these students will make, every future decision on food security and grocery shopping, every decision as a citizen scientist when they go to the polls and vote on climate change policies… everything depends on integrated sciences, and the Omics sciences are at the heart of all of this.

Bruce Fouke, Professor, University of Illinois

So one purpose of the event was to expose the students to STEM via topics related to DNA and Health, plus Omics research at Illinois. The idea was that as students did fun, hands-on activities about DNA (building DNA models), DNA extraction (extracting DNA from strawberries), DNA to RNA to protein (making paper models of nitrogen bases), science equipment (making a centrifuge), emergence of life and DNA and mutations (using microscopes), cancer (cause, prevention, and treatment), and drug building (building models of molecules), they would not only learn about the subject matter, but begin to feel comfortable with the idea that they too can do science.

Another purpose of the event? To expose the students, many from under-served populations, to the idea that like many of the Illinois rsearchers at the event, they too could have a career in STEM. For example, during his presentation, Bruce Fouke, an Illinois professor in both Geology and Microbiology, strongly advocated the notion that students are scholar-athletes, and that they should prepare for careers beyond sports. 

In our modern-day, globally-connected, sports-crazed society, so often the approach is to say that a student is a great athlete. Then, as an afterthought, it might be mentioned in passing that this same student is in school and that they should also achieve good grades. However, all emphasis and recognition is placed on the “athlete” aspect, and minimal-to-no emphasis is placed on the “scholar” aspect…Both academics and sports endeavors are vitally important, and neither can truly exist without the other….but to constantly short change and deemphasize the “scholar” is a tragic disservice to all students, which ends up threatening their future as well as that of society as a whole.

Bruce Fouke, Professor, University of Illinois

However, the meat of Fouke’s message was an exhortation to students that their time as an athlete would most likely be transient, and that they needed to prepare for a career for the rest of their lives.

“The vast (99%) majority of students will never be professional athletes,” explains Fouke, “and thus their livelihoods and future wellbeing absolutely depends on them being scholars first and athletes second. And even for those that do make it to the pros, their bodies will not work forever, and every pro athlete must at some time in their lives depend on the development of their scholarly life to succeed and survive in our society.” Fouke further emphasized that “both the “scholar” and the “athlete” aspects of a student’s life require exactly the same skill set to be successful…dedication, commitment, hard work, diligence, heads-up recognition of everything that is happening around you, learning the rules and playing by the rules, teamwork, mutual respect and sportsmanship.” To help the scholar-athletes see themselves in a career in science, a main strategy of the DNA & Health Day was to expose them to some folks at Illinois. Chemistry undergrads dropped by to do a centrifuge activity; members of REACT also showed up to lead an activity about building molecules.. Plus, the high-schoolers also met some “Omics” researchers at Illinois, like Bruce Fouke. And serving as mentors at each table of students were outreach-minded Ph.D. students, many from MCB (School of Molecular & Cellular Biology) and members of the MCBees graduate student association.

A UHS student examines a sample through a ZEISS Primo Star microscope in IGB’s Training Lab. Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Innes, I-STEM.

One researcher who took a break from his lab to mentor was Max Baymiller. A Ph.D. student in Biochemistry, his research is in proteomics; he looks at how ancient and essential proteins that write the genetic code have been recently adapted for new functions in the cell. One reason Baymiller participated was to help students discover that scientists are just regular people. “I think the biggest benefit they get is just getting to meet scientists, and say ‘Hey, these are just normal people like me.” It lets students be more confident about pursuing STEM careers themselves,” says Baymiller. He also hoped to promote dialogue: “With so much opposition to science from prominent public figures going on today, I feel like there has never been a more important time to talk to non-scientists about how we know what we know in science.” Baymiller clearly enjoyed interacting with the UHS students. “When I got the directions to an activity wrong,” he explains, “and the students in my group corrected me, I was like ‘Where are you guys when I’m messing stuff up in lab? We should trade jobs!’”

Max Baymiller (second from left) works with DNA Day participants to construct a model of DNA. Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Innes, I-STEM.

According to Baymiller, the high-schoolers particularly enjoyed a couple of activities: “Extracting DNA is always enjoyable,” he admits, “because it’s messy and gives you this tangible product for a previously hard-to-visualize idea. But, the amazing honey bee brain virtual reality system the IGB has can’t be beat; so cool to see real research results be communicated so well!” Baymiller was referring to an activity students did during the IGB tour that was perfect for today’s electronics-savvy teens. Decked out in virtual reality goggles and armed with a game-type controller, students explored images of a honey bee’s brain. Another highlight on the tour? Kids got their hands on another state-of-the-art technology— microscopes. At IGB’s Training Lab, students got an up-close look at samples from some of Fouke’s research through ZEISS microscopes: rocks from Yellowstone, coral from the Caribbean, and human kidney stones. Also, a few students got to actually operate a SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope), which uses electrons instead of light to form an image.

Shavi Azam, a Microbiology Ph.D. student (center) works with UHS high-schoolers to help them build a model of DNA. Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Innes, I-STEM.

Like Baymiller, another mentor, Mara Livezey, an MCB Ph.D. student and Outreach Coordinator of the MCBees, also participated in DNA/Health Day in hopes of getting some high-schoolers excited about science: “I want to increase understanding of and excitement about science in young people. I think high schoolers are the perfect age group to target because they are just starting to think about going to college and what their future might hold. If I can in some way influence them to consider studying a STEM field or get them thinking about a career in STEM, then I have done what I have set out to do. Jobs in STEM have been historically important and will continue to be important for continuing progress worldwide.” Plus, Livezey also saw it as a great opportunity to recruit underrepresented students into STEM fields: “I was excited about working with these students in particular because I am very passionate about increasing diversity in STEM. For me, this means reaching out to underrepresented minorities and women and getting them curious about what I do in a lab every day. Science is done better when diverse minds work together, so I want to do whatever I can to recruit diversity to STEM.” Livezey believes that one of the more important benefits for the students was the one-on-one interaction with the grad student mentors. Like Baymiller, she also hoped to enable the students to discover that scientists are just regular folk. “I think it is important for high school students to realize that scientists are normal people, just like them,” she admits. “My hope is that when they see this, they realize that they could be successful going to college for STEM and even pursuing an advanced degree in STEM.” Livezey was enthusiastic about the different hands-on activities at the event. “The students loved the virtual reality goggles and exploring the honey bee brain. This age group really engages with technology, so I think that activity was great! The students also enjoyed building the 3D DNA model and seemed to be really into it when they started competing with other tables to build the biggest model. I think the students enjoyed this particular activity because they took ownership over building something from nothing, while figuring out how the parts go together and how an accurate 3D DNA model should look. Similarly, I think the students really enjoyed building 3D drug molecules.”

A UHS student shows the DNA he extracted from strawberries during one of the DNA & Health Day hands-on activities. Photo courtesyo of Elizabeth Innes, I-STEM.

In addition to encouraging students that they too could go to college to study science, students were apprised of Illinois resources available to help them achieve that goal. During lunch, representatives from several offices on campus dropped by to give talks about resources to help students navigate challenges they might encounter in getting a college education. Curtis Blanden, from the Office of Minority Student Affairs, presented about how Illinois’ TRIO Programs (Academic Talent Search, Upward Bound, Student Support Services, Ronald E. McNair Scholars Programs) could help them transition from high school to college/career. Also on hand to present during lunch was Alejandra Stenger, MCB Merit Program Coordinator, who discussed how her program is a resource for students in biology, chemistry, and math. Daniel Wong from the Graduate College’s Educational Equity Programs office spoke about the importance of mentors in helping students figure out the “hidden curriculum” in college. He also encouraged students to not only go to college, but to go on for a Ph.D. once they’d gotten their Bachelor’s degree. Wong, whose office has numerous programs, gave students his email and challenged them to contact him—once they got into college, because SROP (Summer Research Opportunities Program) could be helpfulm and when considering grad school, because programs like the SPI (Summer Pre-Doctoral Institute) could help them achieve those goals. Finally, he challenged them to contact him even before that—as early as next week!

Illinois researcher Bruce Fouke speaking to the UHS students. Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Innes, I-STEM.

I-STEM expresses its appreciation to the IGB for helping to host the event. In fact, according to Fouke, it was apropos that an event featuring the Omics should be held at the IGB. “Ground-zero for all of the explosive OMICS Sciences revolution all began at Illinois with the pioneering work of Professor Carl R. Woese. The Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology is therefore a spectacularly fitting venue within which to bring students to learn about how every aspect of our lives are being impacted by the exposition of Omics sciences, and it all started right here at Illinois.” What kind of impact did the DNA & Health Day have? According to Fouke, it fostered a great deal of excitement. “I have seen many of the Urbana High School students around town since the event was held. Without exception, their first statement has been ‘When is the next event? I learned so much, and I can’t wait!’”

Learn more about I-STEM, the Illinois STEM Education Initiative

Discover the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology (IGB) in Illinois

Digital Classroom Microscopes by ZEISS – discover a world of new possibilities

Story and photographs courtesy of Elizabeth Innes, Communications Specialist, I-STEM Education Initiative.

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Integrated Scientific Imaging with ZEISS Digital Classroom

ZEISS & Swansea University highlight impact of microscopy solutions to improve quality of teaching

The Advanced Imaging of Materials (AIM) facility at Swansea University is an integrated scientific imaging centre with a strong focus on correlative microscopy. It aims to provide imaging and analytical capabilities across several length scales; from Angstroms to centimetres. The centre is designed to support industry, teaching and learning and fundamental research.

One of the unique features of AIM is the ZEISS Digital Classroom. This features 30 digital ZEISS Primotech microscopes which are each connected to an iPad and have the ability to stream onto the multiple screens around the lab. We spoke to Co-Directors of the AIM facility Dr. Cameron Pleydell-Pearce and Dr. Richard Johnston, who together manage the facility on a day-to-day basis and were instrumental in setting up the centre. Both have their own students and research groups who regularly use the ZEISS Digital Classroom.

Improving quality of teaching

“We wanted to invest in a digital classroom setup primarily to improve the quality of teaching. In our opinion, microscopy as a discipline has moved on and so we needed to keep up with this and have the capability for digital image capture on every microscope. If you want all of your students to be invested in digital learning, then really you can’t limit their access to that digital capability.

Now that we have the capability to capture images on all of our microscopes, this has allowed us to change the focus and quality of our teaching. Our vision was to make it easier to use the microscopes and easier to capture the data. This allows more time to focus on interpretation and analysis of what is seen under the microscope.

Overall engagement of students has improved as they are starting to ask more questions about the samples – we never saw that level of engagement before. The new ZEISS Digital Classroom setup facilitates a much more interactive environment, with students able to approach you with their tablet and simply ask “what is this?”

With the tablets making the student microscope views visible, it is much easier to give real-time feedback to the students – are they looking at the right structure or acquiring the right kinds of images? This is what we find most useful as lecturers, especially when teaching students who have never used a microscope before.”

Industry Engagement

“With our traditional lab setup in the past we would never have been able to engage people to the extent we do now with our new ZEISS Digital Classroom setup – especially our clients from industry.

In the past I don’t think we would have ever been able to convince a company to bring in 15 people to sit in front of the traditional microscopes. With the new ZEISS Digital Classroom setup featuring 30 microscopes, iPads and the ability to broadcast each microscope onto the main screens, it has created a much more interactive and vibrant atmosphere for industry.

The digital microscopy facility really helps us to demonstrate added value for our current and potential industry partners – we not only engage with them on research but also have the ability to train their operators.

In the future we are planning to actively promote this as a service for companies, to help us build new partnerships and improve our level of industry engagement overall. New revenue generation is also important for the facility to be sustainable.”

State-of-the-art Facility

“We initially only had the funding for seven ZEISS Primotech microscopes. However when these were delivered, we instantly saw their value and the potential to make our whole microscopy lab digital. We had to convince the Director of Learning & Teaching and other stakeholders to invest in another 23 microscopes.

Our main argument was to demonstrate how the ZEISS Digital Classroom setup could enhance the learning environment and improve the teaching facilities. We did this by simply showing a traditional microscope setup with a pencil and paper, compared to one of the new digital microscopes with an iPad. We then asked what direction they wanted the University to go in – and from that we got the backing to fund the whole lab!

Although the digital ZEISS Primotech microscopes are a higher investment than a standard microscope, we were able to secure the funding internally by demonstrating how they would dramatically improve the teaching environment and better fit with our new modern facility.”

Recommendation

From our perspective, what really stood about ZEISS was the superior quality and the ability to supply all of the systems we are looking for; from optical and electron to X-ray microscope systems. We would definitely recommend ZEISS because we were able to form a partnership, rather than just be a customer.

Click here to read more about the ZEISS Digital Classroom solution

About the AIM at the College of Engineering, Swansea University, Wales, UK

AIM is an £9M EPSRC/Welsh Government funded integrated scientific imaging facility for Wales that can provide imaging and analytical capabilities across several length scales from Angstroms to centimetres. The Centre will provide a fully-coupled micro/nano-analysis workflow via a state-of-the-art advanced correlative imaging (combining different data sets across length scales) with capability in transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Ion beam nanofabrication, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), and micro and nano X-ray computed tomography (microCT).

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ZEISS Donates Digital Classroom Technology to ASM International Teachers’ Camp

ZEISS announces that it participated in a Teachers’ Camp held by ASM International for high school-level STEM instructors at Manzano High School in Albuquerque, New Mexico. ZEISS donated a Stemi 305 stereo microscope with integrated wireless camera to the ASM Educational Foundation, which was used during the Teachers’ Camp and then given to the classroom of Margaret Showalter, one of the master teachers who organized and led the event.

The camp lasted five days, and ZEISS Product Marketing Manager Chris Souwand participated on the first day in order to set up the microscope and demonstrate its capabilities. The master teachers who facilitated the camp then used the microscope throughout the event, organizing activities to teach participating teachers about material properties and projecting microscope images that corresponded to the activities in order to foster discussion among the entire group.

The interactive Digital Classroom by ZEISS enables instructors to give their students a closer look at the materials or organisms that they are studying, and to provide a shared experience that can then foster discussion and learning among the entire group of students.

Utilizing the microscope and associated technology during the Teachers’ Camp enabled the master teachers who facilitated the event to add an additional, engaging dimension to their activities and instructions and to provide inspiration to the other instructors present regarding the education possibilities of microscopy.

ZEISS Product Marketing Manager, Chris Souwand
Stemi 305 stereo microscope with integrated wireless camera at the 2016 ASM Teachers’ Camp

ZEISS Digital Classroom technology helps to produce an engaging atmosphere that motivates students to discover their field of study and to reach their learning goals. With ZEISS microscopes and the imaging app Labscope, it is easy to create a digital classroom with a single microscope or a network of connected school microscopes. Instructors can monitor all student microscopes from an iPad or iPhone, and can easily project real-time images.

ZEISS Stemi 305 with its 5:1 zoom is ideal for educational environments. Stemi 305 allows users to observe samples as they are – three-dimensional and crisp in contrast – with no preparation required. The microscope is easy to use and fully integrated, including long-living LED illumination for reflected and transmitted light and documentation. The microscope is available with a conventional phototube for access to all ZEISS microscope cameras, or with an integrated 1.2 Megapixel Wi-Fi camera, which allows users to wirelessly connect several microscopes and share images.

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Microscopy Today 2016 Innovation Award for ZEISS Digital Classroom Solution

ZEISS Stemi 305 cam with Labscope imaging app – the interactive way of teaching

ZEISS is one of this year’s winners of the Microscopy Today Innovation Award. At the 2016 Microscopy & Microanalysis Meeting (M&M 2016) in Columbus, Ohio, ZEISS Stemi 305 cam with Labscope has been recognized as one of the ten most innovative products of the year.

ZEISS Stemi 305 is a compact stereo microscope with 5:1 zoom and integrated LED illumination for reflected and transmitted light – plus fast, easy-to-use documentation. Stemi 305 lets users observe samples as they really are: three-dimensional and crisp in contrast – no preparation needed. A fast color Wi-Fi camera and wireless router are already integrated into the body of Stemi 305 cam, allowing the microscope to be instantly connected with the Labscope imaging app.

Labscope displays the live images of all connected ZEISS microscopes in the network for presentation via an HD projector and on the student’s individual mobile tablet or smartphone. This way, students can check the image details on their own display while listening to the teacher’s explanation. After the lesson the teacher shares images via the internal facility network, or by using email or various chat programs. Students share their exercises via the internet when submitting their assignments, or share their best microscopy images with their friends and family on social networks.

Digital classroom at the Hainberg Gymnasium in Goettingen with ZEISS Primo Star HDcam and Stemi 305 cam.

We’re very proud to receive the Microscopy Today 2016 Innovation Award for our Digital Classroom solution. Young people are growing up in a digitized, interconnected environment. To motivate students they get to work with universal tools that are already part of their lives, such as mobile devices. The award shows that connectivity has the potential to revolutionize the classroom experience with engaged students that share an experience of science and passion. With Labscope, lecture & listen transforms into show & engage.

Peter Kraemer, Head of Segment Marketing for Education and Routine at ZEISS Microscopy

All Labscope-ready ZEISS microscopes such as Primo Star HDcam, Primotech, Primovert HDcam or Stemi 305 cam can be used to connect to a Wi-Fi-enabled network that spans the whole classroom. In combination with the ZEISS Axiocam ERc 5s microscope camera, any other light microscope can become a fully connected student or teacher microscope. To experience the possibilities of the ZEISS Digital Classroom, download the free iPad and iPhone app Labscope from the Apple App Store.

More details:

The Digital Classroom Experience – Made by ZEISS

Learn more about Labscope, the free microscopy imaging app, and download today!

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