Insights from M&M 2019

Observations from a ZEISS executive leader on one of the largest microscopy conferences in the world

The annual Microscopy & Microanalysis (M&M) conference was recently held in Portland, Oregon, USA. ZEISS is one of the largest sponsors and exhibitors at this meeting for the Microscopy Society of America that is dedicated to the promotion and advancement of techniques and applications of microscopy and microanalysis in all relevant scientific disciplines.

Allister McBride, Senior Director at ZEISS, at M&M 2019

In attendance was Allister McBride, a senior director at ZEISS who is responsible for materials research strategy. This includes understanding new trends in the market, translating those into customer needs, and working with R&D to create innovative solutions. Allister provided the following commentary on what he felt were some of the more interesting new trends and topics at this year’s M&M.

Overarching themes observed at M&M

This year’s M&M conference really impressed with the quality of the conference talks. This was clearly visible as many of the conference rooms were standing room only. The conference themes this year have moved away from discussing incremental instrumentation hardware improvements and were much more related to direct megatrends such as batteries, additive manufacturing and advanced material characterization. Many of the presentations discussed API driven automated experiments across the microscopy spectrum involving in situ rigs or 3D/4D analytical techniques.

4D analytics using LabDCT analysis of sintered copper particles representing the development of grain boundaries with heating. This data was taken from S.A. McDonald et al., Scientific Reports 7, 5251 (2017) and presented as an example in P13.1 ‘Advanced Characterization of Components Fabricated by Additive Manufacturing’

Multidimensional and multimodal characterization

There was a definite theme of performing multidimensional and multimodal characterization using different modalities. For examples, work done in talk 616 “Nondestructive 3D Nanoscale X-Ray Imaging of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells in the Laboratory” from the Colorado School of Mines and talk 617 “High Resolution 3D and 4D Characterization of Microstructure Formation in Novel Ti Alloys for Additive Manufacturing” from RWTH Aachen gave excellent examples of how this technique is used across two megatrend topics of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and additive manufacturing research, respectively. In line with the theme of multimodal analysis, ZEISS took the opportunity to provide an update on its Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) developments using neon ions as the secondary ion source.

SIMS image of a BAM L200 reference sample. (a) Total ion count (TIC). (b) Composite image of aluminum (red) and gallium (green). (c) Line profile of aluminum layers with corresponding SIMS map and schematic layout of the sample. The lines with a distance of 17.5 nm are resolved.

It really is a fantastic technology which is now enabling spatial resolutions of 15 nm as shown by the University of Cambridge in the poster “Analytics on the FIB: ORION-SIMS and the Discovery of a Unique, Chondrite-like, Precambrian Impactor.”

Combining multidimensional imaging with machine-based learning

Examples combining multidimensional characterization in a correlative manner were also demonstrated and this, combined with advanced segmentation techniques (EG. Session A02.1 – Data Acquisition Schemes, Machine Learning Algorithms, and Open Source Software Development for Electron Microscopy), produced some interesting results which could not have been achieved without the combination of multiscale, multidimensional correlated imaging combined with machine learning based multichannel segmentation. This has recently become a hot topic as the power of machine learning to simultaneously segment datasets of various origins across length and dimensional scales is finding relevance in many diverse fields (e.g. A05.7-806 – “Projecting into the Third Dimension: 3D Ore Mineralogy via Machine Learning of Automated Mineralogy and X-Ray Microscopy”).

X-ray microscopy

X-ray microscopy was also a large theme across the board which shows that the conference itself has grown much broader than its initial roots in scanning electron microscopy. It was really fascinating to see how the resolution of this technique is increasing with a great example showing spirals forming from eutectic solidification in work by the University of Michigan (A05.4-336 – “Formation of Faceted Spirals during Directional Eutectic Solidification”) at ~50 nm resolution.

Overall, the depth and breadth of topics covered resonated extremely well with technology investments that ZEISS has made over the past several years and it was great to see customers using these capabilities in new and interesting ways.

A great example of this was talk A10.P2-1167 – “A Fast and Accurate Workflow for Analytic 3D FIBSEM Tomography” which was a collaborative talk between ZEISS and The University of Plymouth using the ZEISS Crossbeam FIB-SEM.

ZEISS Crossbeam in use in the ZEISS booth at M&M 2019
  • Read more about the new capabilities of ZEISS Crossbeam featured at M&M 2019.

Read Next – More Articles on Materials Research

Topic Materials Research

Blocking Radiation in Wearable Devices

Read article

Peering Inside the Solidification Process of Metals

Read article

Microscopy Techniques for Energy Materials

Read article

Investigating Cements for Endodontology

Read article

Foundation Stone Ceremony for World-Class High-Resolution Microscopy Centre in Heidelberg

ZEISS supports new EMBL Imaging Centre with solutions for correlative microscopy

A foundation stone ceremony for the new EMBL Imaging Centre, located on the campus of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, took place on 1st April 2019. The new facility will give researchers access to the most modern microscopy technologies available. It is made possible by a collaboration between the German Federal Government (BMBF), the State of Baden-Württemberg (MWK), EMBL, and by further contributions from several industry partners. The EMBL Imaging Centre will open in 2021.

On 1 April 2019, the Foundation Stone Ceremony of the EMBL Imaging Centre took place. Representatives of EMBL and all involved partners took place in the ceremony. Photo: EMBL

The new EMBL Imaging Centre will be for state-of-the-art high and ultra-high resolution electron and light microscopy techniques, including new developments not yet commercially available. As one of the cooperation partners, ZEISS is providing solutions for correlative microscopy.

The heart of the centre consists of several high-end electron and light microscopes. Among them are microscopes – co-developed at EMBL – specifically configured for linking light and electron microscopy. The combination of these two very different microscopy techniques enables scientists to bring together functional and structural information to gain new insights.

The new centre will be open to up to 300 visiting researchers per year. This means EMBL’s expertise in imaging technologies and data analysis will pass on to other locations, promoting scientific discovery in EMBL’s member states and beyond. As such, the EMBL Imaging Centre will function as a training facility for the most advanced imaging technologies. Highly qualified experts from EMBL will not only provide training on the microscopes but also on sample preparation and data analysis, tailored to the needs of visiting researchers. An additional aim of the centre is to develop the next generation of imaging technologies for life science applications in close cooperation with industrial partners.

EMBL was set up in order to promote molecular biology across Europe, and to be a centre of excellence for Europe’s leading young molecular biologists. Training, technology development and providing services to scientists are important aspects of our mission. The new EMBL Imaging Centre embodies this mission and extends it to users not only from Europe but from all over the world.

EMBL Director General Edith Heard

Read the EMBL press release

More information on correlative microscopy from ZEISS

For more than 40 years, EMBL has performed fundamental research in the molecular life sciences and developed new technologies to further this research. EMBL presently hosts more than 85 highly interdisciplinary research groups across its six sites in Europe. EMBL, which is currently supported by 26 member states, is one of the cradles of the current revolution in light and electron microscopy.

More Articles on Imaging Facilities & Centers

Topic Imaging Facilities & Centers

Making Pathology Research More Efficient

Read article

New Light Sheet Microscope for Multiview Imaging of Large Specimens

Read article

ZEISS Wins R&D 100 Award for Superresolution Microscope

Read article

Automated Microscope for Gentle and Fast Confocal 4D Imaging

Read article

Spotlight on Cell Ultrastructure

New correlative approach combines superresolution confocal and scanning electron imaging

Researchers from the Department of Cell Biology, theme Nanomedicine, and the ‘Microscopy Imaging Center’ at the Radboudumc in Nijmegen, Netherlands recently developed and optimized a pipeline for correlative imaging using superresolution (SR) microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

ZEISS Airyscan and SEM correlative imaging pipeline. (1) ITO-coated coverslips are marked on three edges for stage calibration on the Zeiss LSM880 and Sigma 300. (2) Cells are seeded on the marked coverslips for at least 3 h. (3) Live cells are sonicated to prepare VPMs and immediately fixed. (4) Sample is immunolabeled for the proteins of interest, fixed for the second time and fiducials are added. (5) The sample is imaged with Airyscan microscopy. (6) The sample is dehydrated, critical point dried and then sputtered with 5 nm chromium. (7) The sample is imaged with SEM microscopy. (8) Fiducials are used to align the LM and SEM image using Matlab.

This state-of-the-art imaging approach allows the correlative visualization of up to three cellular components by SR fluorescence microscopy and the cellular ultrastructure by SEM.

In other words, one can fluorescently label up to three different proteins and accurately determine their localization with respect to specific cellular ultrastructures.

Ben Joosten, cell biologist and part of the research team at the Radboudumc
VPM preparation and CPD procedure preserve podosome organization. (A) DCs were seeded on glass coverslips and after VPM preparation, cells were fixed and stained for actin (cyan), vinculin (green) and zyxin (magenta). After CPD, DCs were imaged by SEM (gray). Shown are representative images of all three channels in three dimensions and the corresponding SEM image. Insets depict two representative podosomes within the cluster. (B) Shown are the SEM-LM overlays for all three channels for the same cells as in (A) Scale bar = 5 μm.

Narrowing the resolution gap

Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) was so far performed using conventional light microscopy (LM) and electron microscopy (EM). Although this offered unique and complementary information from the same cell or tissue sample, the interpretation of those correlative images was challenged by the fact that the lateral resolution of conventional LM (~250 nm) is much worse than the lateral resolution of EM (~2 nm). This is referred to as the “resolution gap”.

The Radboundumc research team: Top row from left: Marieke Willemse, Jack Fransen; Bottom row from left: Ben Joosten, Koen van den Dries and Alessandra Cambi

Our correlative imaging pipeline, called SR-CLEM, narrows this gap as it combines the ultrastructure provided by the ZEISS Sigma SEM with super-resolved fluorescent images acquired with ZEISS LSM 800 with Airyscan (lateral resolution of ~140 nm).

Ben Joosten, cell biologist and part of the research team at the Radboudumc

He and his colleague Koen van den Dries used SR-CLEM to study the nanoscale architecture of podosomes, small cytoskeletal structures used by leukocytes to transmigrate basement membranes or by osteoclasts to remodel bone tissue. The results of the study are published in Frontiers in Immunology, the most-cited open-access journal in immunology.

The SR-CLEM approach is particularly interesting for elucidating the organization of complex multimolecular cellular structures as well as for characterizing microorganisms, nanomaterials or nanoparticles and their interaction with cells.

Jack Fransen, Associate Professor at the Radboudumc

Read the paper, published in Frontiers in Immunology, here

More information on Correlative Microscopy Solutions from ZEISS

More Articles on Cell Biology & Cancer Research

Topic Cell Biology & Cancer Research

Probing the Molecules that Control Protein Levels in Your Cells

Read article

Making Pathology Research More Efficient

Read article

Looking Closely at Germ Cell Development

Read article

New Light Sheet Microscope for Multiview Imaging of Large Specimens

Read article

Webinar: Battery Research With Advanced Microscopy and Image Processing

From Sample Preparation to 3D Reconstruction and Quantification

Li-ion battery electrodes consist of active material, binder and carbon additives. As these three components and the respective interfaces influence for example the charge transfer reactions and thus the capacity of the battery, it is of major interest to understand their detailed properties in depth.

For reliable results it is crucial to master the sample preparation, to understand the image processing algorithms and optimize the reconstruction procedure.

Microscopy helps to gain insights into the inner structure of batteries.

In this webinar Stefanie Freitag from ZEISS will first give an introduction about existing advanced microscopic techniques for battery research including the presentation of possibilities for in-situ observations. In the second part Dr. Jochen Joos from KIT will explain his established workflow from sample preparation to 3D reconstruction and describe hurdles and solutions concerning image processing.

Register here and watch the webinar free of charge
Thursday, 21 March 2019 | 4 p.m. (CET)

Who should attend:

  • Battery researchers who are familiar with the components of a battery
  • Researchers who are seeking new ideas for chemical battery studies
  • Battery researchers that are aiming for 3D battery scans

Key Learning Objectives:

  • Explore how in-situ technologies can be used for battery studies and which technology will be helpful for a specific research task
  • Learn how battery samples can be prepared, especially when different phases shall be made visible
  • Discover how non-destructive X-ray microscopy can be used in battery research
  • Understand the challenges of image segmentation and 3D reconstruction of FIB-SEM data sets
  • Get to know ways to quantify the different phases in batteries

Watch the webinar for free

More information on battery research with ZEISS instruments

Read Next – More Articles on Batteries & Energy

Topic Batteries & Energy

Microscopy Techniques for Energy Materials

Read article

An Overview of 3D X-ray Microscopy

Read article

Enhancing Efficiency in Multi-scale and Multi-modal Workflows

Read article

“The Hydrogen Era is Yet to Come

Read article

Improving Efficiency in the Materials Lab – Part 3

Accessing your images, data, and workflow templates any time at any place with ZEISS ZEN Data Storage

In this series, we are introducing the newest modules of ZEISS ZEN core – the most comprehensive suite of imaging, analysis, and data connectivity tools for multi-modal microscopy in connected material laboratories.

Advancing data management in your microscopy lab

A huge amount of images and data needs to be managed, especially in larger lab environments. It is almost impossible to bring data from different systems together to extract the maximum information.

With ZEISS ZEN Data Storage, your operators, analysts, and lab managers can access all data from different systems, or even locations. Metadata helps you to find whatever content you look for, whenever you need it. Your lab equipment can be utilized much more effectively by separating image acquisition from data analysis. You can share instrument presets and workflows between experts and non-expert users to always assure the quality of your analyses. Correlating data from different microscopes becomes easier than ever before.

ZEISS ZEN Data Storage is part of the software suite ZEISS ZEN core, it is compatible with all ZEISS microscopes and even integrates third party solutions.

More information on ZEISS ZEN core

More information on ZEISS ZEN Data Storage

Read Next – More Articles for Imaging Facilities & Centers

Topic Imaging Facilities & Centers

Making Pathology Research More Efficient

Read article

New Light Sheet Microscope for Multiview Imaging of Large Specimens

Read article

ZEISS Wins R&D 100 Award for Superresolution Microscope

Read article

Automated Microscope for Gentle and Fast Confocal 4D Imaging

Read article

Improving Efficiency in the Materials Lab – Part 2

Organizing images from any source to connect multi-modal data with ZEISS ZEN Connect

In this series, we are introducing the newest modules of ZEISS ZEN core – the most comprehensive suite of imaging, analysis, and data connectivity tools for multi-modal microscopy in connected material laboratories.

Focus on your sample analysis

In quality and materials labs, you’d often examine your sample with different instruments – to characterize it as completely as possible. But what’s most important to you is to analyze the data from your sample. It doesn’t matter which microscope you used to get it initially.

ZEISS ZEN Connect is your solution – keeping all data from multiple sources together. It lets you visualize the relationship between different microscopy images and data from the same sample, all in one place.

Researchers can use the workflow of ZEISS ZEN Connect to go from a quick overview image in a light microscope to advanced imaging with a high-resolution system. The overview image for navigation and all subsequent images will automatically be shown in context. The multi-modal data is then saved in well-organized projects with intuitive image labels.

Watch this webinar to learn more about ZEISS ZEN Connect.

More information on ZEISS ZEN core

More information on ZEISS ZEN Connect

Read Next – More Articles for Imaging Facilities & Centers

Topic Imaging Facilities & Centers

Making Pathology Research More Efficient

Read article

New Light Sheet Microscope for Multiview Imaging of Large Specimens

Read article

ZEISS Wins R&D 100 Award for Superresolution Microscope

Read article

Automated Microscope for Gentle and Fast Confocal 4D Imaging

Read article

How Can a Toothbrush and Toothpaste Be a Perfect Match?

APEER helps to analyze all imaging data and unveils new perspectives

In a number of projects, researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Microstructure of Materials and Systems IMWS in the German city of Halle investigate the interactions between teeth and various dental care products – mainly toothbrushes and toothpastes. The researchers are focusing primarily on structural-morphological and chemical factors and abrasion resistance. They work with techniques from the areas of microstructural analysis and material science. With the help of light scanning electron and X-ray microscopes, they characterize the microstructure of eroded tooth surfaces.

A large number of images to evaluate

IMWS researchers typically acquire many images from different kinds of interactions between toothbrushes and toothpaste, but only analyze very few of them and try to derive some general trends from these.

APEER now provides new perspectives:

With APEER, we can now take all the data and extract from all the data by correlation trends which we might not have seen before. In addition, we need fewer people to do this and our highly skilled staff can essentially focus on more creative parts: how we can design your toothpaste or how the design of a new toothbrush would look.

Professor Ralf Wehrspohn, Director of the Fraunhofer Institute for Microstructure of Materials and Systems IMWS

More information on APEER

Read Next – More Articles on Materials Research

Topic Materials Research

Blocking Radiation in Wearable Devices

Read article

Peering Inside the Solidification Process of Metals

Read article

Microscopy Techniques for Energy Materials

Read article

Investigating Cements for Endodontology

Read article

Connecting Information Across Dimensions With the New ZEISS ZEN Connect Imaging Software

Experience seamless data handling, simplified workflows and enriched insights into your samples

ZEISS ZEN Connect is especially useful for, but not limited to, structural analysis, examination of cellular processes, localization of cells, and much more. The proven ZEISS ZEN software combines numerous functions for day-to-day work with microscopes and stands for scientific success. The ZEISS ZEN Connect module enhances research by introducing three new features.

Intuitive data management, simplified sample workflows, and unlimited navigation

ZEISS ZEN Connect ensures that you can focus on the data rather than on the acquisition method. You initiate a workflow with any microscope, analyze a full sample on a large scale, and identify the specific areas of interest with the automatic overlay and relocation algorithm. Moreover, it uniquely enables you to analyze data in a wider context connecting large field of view images with the highest resolution details. You benefit from project based data storage and effortless image labeling which enables better control over the data structure in complex experiment set-ups.

ZEISS ZEN Connect offers intuitive data management, simplified sample workflows, and unlimited navigation

ZEISS ZEN Connect is available for the company’s full range of optical, confocal, X-ray, electron, and ion microscopes. It is especially recommended for correlation of ZEISS LSM 800 and ZEISS GeminiSEM; but also compatible with most light and electron microscopes from ZEISS.

ZEISS ZEN Connect is offered on a 60-day free trial basis. Existing customers may use it in conjunction with their ZEISS ZEN Blue or ZEISS SmartSEM 6.2 or higher software, while new users may freely download ZEISS ZEN Lite in order to test the software’s capabilities. Furthermore, the third party image feature can be acquired separately.

Download ZEISS ZEN Connect on a 60-day free trial basis

Download ZEISS ZEN Lite

Read Next – Articles for Imaging Facilities & Centers

Topic Imaging Facilities & Centers

Making Pathology Research More Efficient

Read article

New Light Sheet Microscope for Multiview Imaging of Large Specimens

Read article

ZEISS Wins R&D 100 Award for Superresolution Microscope

Read article

Automated Microscope for Gentle and Fast Confocal 4D Imaging

Read article

2018 Scientists’ Choice Award for ZEISS

Best Analytical Science Article of 2017 goes to Dr. Timo Bernthaler

The 2018 Scientists’ Choice Award for the Best Analytical Science Article 2017 went to ‘Could Correlative Microscopy Solve the Energy Problems of the Future?‘, an in-depth article featuring Dr. Timo Bernthaler, materials scientist at IMFAA, Germany. In the interview Bernthaler discusses his characterization work on energy storage, magnetic and 3D printed materials and how correlative microscopy from ZEISS is accelerating his research.

Close cooperation with ZEISS

Microscopy is the core technology for all of the IMFAA’s research fields as the microscope enables them to analyze the relationships between the materials. Bernthaler and his team have a great relationship with ZEISS, and lots of ZEISS microscopes in their department.

ZEISS wins 2018 Scientists’ Choice Award

It is with great pleasure that I accept this award and honor on behalf of our research team at the Materials Research Institute (IMFAA) at Aalen University, Germany. It was a pleasure to enhance research into materials for energy conversion, additive processing and energy storage by using correlative microscopic approaches and to explain the relevance of this important research. My thanks are also going to Sonia Nicolas and Sarah Thomas from SelectScience, for their professional assistance in producing the interview and the outstanding article. Of course, I would finally like to thank some important members of the IMFAA, Tim Schubert, Andreas Kopp, Andreas Jansche and Gerhard Schneider, for their support and vision to push microscopy into new materials and relevant technologies.

The award for Best Analytical Science Article went to Dr. Timo Bernthaler and was accepted at the ceremony by Pascal Anger, of ZEISS, which features in the article

SelectScience® announced the winners of the 2018 Scientists’ Choice Awards® as chosen by scientists from around the globe. Winners and nominees were celebrated during a special SelectScience 20th Anniversary Party at the Pittcon 2018 International Conference and Expo in Orlando, USA this week.

More information on materials research with ZEISS microscopes

More information on correlative microscopy from ZEISS

Read Next

Topic Batteries & Energy

Microscopy Techniques for Energy Materials

Read article

An Overview of 3D X-ray Microscopy

Read article

Enhancing Efficiency in Multi-scale and Multi-modal Workflows

Read article

“The Hydrogen Era is Yet to Come

Read article

Much More Than Simply a Combination of Microscopes

Understanding correlative microscopy

Correlative microscopy is not a single technique, rather a combination of software, technology, and data. It provides streamlined easy-to-use workflows, delivers unique insights into the sample, and lets you acquire more data in less time. 

Watch this video to understand correlative microscopy in under two minutes: 

The challenge

Day after day, researchers, lab technicians, and quality engineers examine numerous specimens in labs all over the world. In each examination, they need to identify a representative region and be able to navigate within the sample at different microscopes: light, electron, ion, X-ray and many more. Next, they need to combine and adjust all the data acquired to get a detailed understanding of the specimen. And then comes the task of overlaying images.

More information about the sample from micro to nano scale

By applying several microscopy techniques to a single sample, microscopists can study it at a much broader range of magnifications than possible with a single technique. Not only does this allow them to conduct an initial low-magnification inspection of a sample to identify specific regions of interest for closer study, but it also generates a much greater range of information about the samples at different scales.

Less time and effort spent on data acquisition

Correlative microscopy from ZEISS provides integrated solutions and seamless workflows.

  • Gain unique insights into your sample
  • Move seamlessly from the micro to nano scale
  • Acquire more data in less time with streamlined workflows
  • Benefit from powerful image and data correlation handling
  • Acquire, handle, and analyze data from 2D to 4D
  • Use correlative coverslips and holders for precise and efficient work

More information on correlative microscopy from ZEISS

Read Next – More Articles for Imaging Facilities & Centers

Topic Imaging Facilities & Centers

Making Pathology Research More Efficient

Read article

New Light Sheet Microscope for Multiview Imaging of Large Specimens

Read article

ZEISS Wins R&D 100 Award for Superresolution Microscope

Read article

Automated Microscope for Gentle and Fast Confocal 4D Imaging

Read article

Free Short Course: Introduction to Micro-Computed Tomography

Lectures, lunch and a visit to the μCT lab at the ESE department at Imperial College London included

Together with ZEISS the Imperial College London is offering a free short course, which introduces participants to micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) as a basic tool for experimental research in porous media. The following topics will be covered by the course:

  • Fundamental principles of micro-CT: from origin to imaging
  • Micro-CT image processing and quantification
  • Specific applications and examples

Included are lectures and a visit to the micro-CT lab at the Department of Earth Science and Engineering of the Imperial College London. Speakers include Matthew Andrew (Oil and Gas Technologist, ZEISS Microscopy) as well as Maja Ruecker and Tom Bultreys (both Imperial College London) and Marijn Boone (XRE). Lunch compliments of ZEISS.

Mineralogical segmentation of 3D micro-CT dataset by correlating electron microscopy with high resolution X-ray microscopy.

Course details:

14 September 2017
9:00 – 18:00 BST
Earth Science and Engineering Dept., Imperial College London

Register here for free

Read Next

Topic Geoscience

Exploring the Dawn of Animal Life

Read article

High Performance Geological Investigation

Read article

Connecting Information Across Dimensions With the New ZEISS ZEN Connect Imaging Software

Read article

Introducing a New X-Ray Micro-Computed Tomography (microCT) System

Read article

ZEISS Instruments in the ECR Quality Lab

Producing engines for champions requires absolute precision

ECR Engines is a high-performance engine production and development company that has earned over 250 victories in NASCAR racing series including the legendary Daytona 500. The company extracts the maximum performance from conventional V8 engines by relentlessly engineering parts to find every possible bit of incremental improvement and through systematic quality inspection of all failure prone parts. Over the last few years, ECR Engines has replaced their equipment from other vendors and is now operates exclusively with ZEISS instruments.

The two best things about our experience with Zeiss have been the quality and dependability of the tools and the level of service and support that we’ve received. It’s been far past our expectations. Both of those things have translated to competitive advantage for us on the race track.

Jim Suth, Quality Manager – ECR Engines

Gain more insights:

ZEISS Microscopy Systems for Inspection, Surface Analysis, and Materials Research

Like auto racing, research also deserves the best tools to help to identify those all-important, incremental performance improvements in materials and processes. Learn more about the unrivaled ZEISS portfolio of high-precision instruments used in the ECR quality lab:

ZEISS Stereo Discovery.V20 stereo microscope for:

  • New component visual inspection
  • Defect analysis, e.g. contamination, corrosion pitting, scratches, mechanical damage
  • Automated acquisition of large-area images

ZEISS Smartzoom 5 digital microscope for:

  • Component wear inspection
  • Inspection of super-finished reflective surfaces
  • Correlative microscopy to define regions of interest for further SEM examination

ZEISS Smartproof 5 confocal microscope for:

  • Non-contact surface finish characterization of soft materials
  • Defect and porosity analysis of bearings
  • Correlative measurement in combination with tactile methods

ZEISS Axio Observer 7 integrated metallografic microscope system for:

  • New material and coating characterization for critical engine applications
  • Particle analysis, e.g. alloy cleanliness, dry-film lubricants, hard thin film coatings

ZEISS EVO MA 25 scanning electron microscope for:

  • Failure analysis of components like springs, bolts and valves
  • Particle analysis, e.g. piston skirt wear, bearing wear, valve seat wear, oil pump wear
  • Chemical analysis

More information on quality control at ECR

Read Next

Topic Quality Assurance

Get Ahead in the Game of Microscopy

Combine multiple imaging technologies from ZEISS and gain new perspectives on your sample

Microscopy is so much more than simply making small things visible. With different microscopy techniques, you can observe living cells in motion, collect three-dimensional measurements, identify chemical elements, count tiny particles, characterize surfaces, create nano structures, and look into the smallest objects without destroying them.

Find out more

Read Next

Topic Imaging Facilities & Centers

Making Pathology Research More Efficient

Read article

New Light Sheet Microscope for Multiview Imaging of Large Specimens

Read article

ZEISS Wins R&D 100 Award for Superresolution Microscope

Read article

Automated Microscope for Gentle and Fast Confocal 4D Imaging

Read article

Witec’s RISE Microscopy Now Available With ZEISS Sigma 300 Scanning Electron Microscope

Improving ease-of-use and accelerating the experimental workflow

WITec’s solution for correlative Raman-SEM imaging is now available for ZEISS Sigma 300, a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). With this jointly-developed system, WITec and ZEISS have furthered their collaboration to provide a fully-integrated instrument available as an OEM product through ZEISS that features a standard, unmodified vacuum chamber and SEM column along with a complete confocal Raman microscope and spectrometer. It expands the range of choices available to the researcher and incorporates generations of experience in Raman spectroscopic imaging and advanced structural analysis.

ZEISS Sigma 300 with RISE (Raman Integrated Scanning Electron Microscopy) system

A seamless combination of two techniques

RISE stands for Raman Imaging and Scanning Electron microscopy. The seamless combination of the two techniques offers a distinct advantage when investigating samples, improves ease-of-use and accelerates experimental workflow. The research-grade optical microscope capability integral to every WITec microscope also helps researchers survey their sample and quickly locate areas of interest. Both the objective and sample stage required for Raman microscopy are placed within the SEM’s vacuum chamber and can therefore remain under vacuum for all measurements; the sample is simply transferred between the Raman and SEM measuring positions using the stage of ZEISS Sigma 300. The configuration allows the Raman microscope to be attached through a standard port of the SEM. The correlation of data and control of Raman measurements are carried out through WITec’s Suite FIVE software, which features a new operating concept with an intuitive interface, automated components and sophisticated software and data analysis routines.

Our Raman technology can visualize the distribution of chemical species within a sample, and do it quickly. Combine that with the structural resolution of SEM and you get a properly comprehensive understanding of a sample. It’s a powerful instrument that’s intuitive as well.

Dr. Olaf Hollricher, Co-founder and Director of R&D at WITec

ZEISS Sigma 300 provides exceptional resolution, contrast and brightness at a price point accessible to most laboratories and working groups. With its Gemini electron optics, including an Inlens secondary electron detector tailored for high-resolution surface-sensitive imaging, the instrument is inherently flexible and precise. FE-SEMs enable structural characterization of particles, surfaces and nanostructures and the ZEISS Sigma series 4-step automated workflow allows for increased productivity.

Designed for a variety of applications

WITec’s modular Raman technology allows 3D chemical characterization by combining a high-resolution confocal microscope with a high-throughput Raman spectrometer. Raman imaging, pioneered by WITec, is a label-free and non-destructive technique capable of identifying and imaging the molecular composition of a sample, making it an ideal complement to scanning electron microscopy.

Comprehensive characterization is essential throughout many scientific fields such as battery research, geology and life sciences. The integration of RISE microscopy in our correlative portfolio aims at delivering cutting edge technology to these and many other areas of research. We are very happy that with WITec we have a partner that shares our ambition to drive scientific advancement.

Dr. Michael Rauscher, Head of Business Sector Materials Sciences at ZEISS Microscopy

RISE really fulfills the promise of correlative microscopy. It gives the user the strengths of Raman and SEM without compromise, all consolidated in one easy to use instrument.

Dr. Philippe Ayasse, Project Manager for RISE microscopy at WITec

All the functions of the respective stand-alone SEM and Raman systems are preserved when combined. Switching between measurement modes is accomplished quickly and easily through the software, which also facilitates the transformation of Raman spectroscopic data into an image which can then be overlaid onto the SEM image to produce a RISE image. This correlative approach can greatly benefit researchers in nanotechnology, life sciences, geosciences, pharmaceutics, materials research and many other fields of application.

More information on the ZEISS Sigma Family

Read Next

Topic Materials Research

Blocking Radiation in Wearable Devices

Read article

Peering Inside the Solidification Process of Metals

Read article

Microscopy Techniques for Energy Materials

Read article

Investigating Cements for Endodontology

Read article

ZEISS Presents a Networked Quality Laboratory

Lab infrastructure solution ZEISS ZEN 2 core is connecting systems, data and workflows

With the new release of the imaging software ZEISS ZEN 2 core, users in laboratories are now even more efficient. ZEISS ZEN 2 core is not only used as a powerful tool for image analysis and interactive control of microscopes. As a lab infrastructure solution ZEISS ZEN 2 core is reflecting multi-modal workflows in connected lab environments with a single general user interface (GUI).

The single-user application of ZEISS ZEN 2 core already supports new functions for image acquisition, image analysis, reporting and managing of sample data. Correlative workflows connect light, digital and electron microscopes for more meaningful analysis. Advanced automation makes work easier and more reproducible. With the help of database interfaces, users use standardised workflows and exchange consistent analysis data between different microscopes, offline workstations, and laboratory sites.

More information on ZEISS ZEN 2 core

Go to the press release

Read Next

Topic Imaging Facilities & Centers

Making Pathology Research More Efficient

Read article

New Light Sheet Microscope for Multiview Imaging of Large Specimens

Read article

ZEISS Wins R&D 100 Award for Superresolution Microscope

Read article

Automated Microscope for Gentle and Fast Confocal 4D Imaging

Read article