Bock hunting with the Victory SF – a report by Anna Lena Kaufmann

In May, nature appears at its best. Throughout the day different sound interweave into a many-voiced orchestra in an almost magical way - and without a conductor. In the morning, the blackbird's singing presents the overture.

Later on, the call of the cuckoo joins in and bees happily buzz their melodies. In the evenings you can hear the crickets chirping and the grass swishing.

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Experiencing the uniqueness of wildlife

For me, there is no typical hunting family tradition and I was not educated in hunting as a child. I just had a couple of friends who took me to a farm in the region, and they just happened to hunt there.

After the first prey, I caught hunting fever. Only then can you understand other hunters. Over time, my hunting passion has increased. But more than anything else I wanted to be outside as often as possible.

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Hunting as a way of life

My father is a hunter but I did not grow up hunting with him. I didn’t discover my passion for hunting until after high school when I began traveling and fell in love with the beauty and variety of species in nature.

I was raised in Southern California where hunting is not a popular activity and my childhood friends did not understand my father’s hunting.

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A magic dwells in each beginning... I always think of this line by Hermann Hesse, a German-born Swiss poet, novelist, and painter, when I find myself roaming through nature at the crack of dawn with all my senses attuned to the awakening of another day – and this morning is no exception.

I’m sitting here “armed” with my new spotting scope, the ZEISS Conquest Gavia, in the green wooded area known as the “Wiesenkanzel”, one of my familiar hunting grounds. A ribbon of soft pink light on the horizon heralds the approaching dawn. Silence reigns, and the only sound is the gentle gurgling of the Amelungsbach creek, beneath where I’m sitting.

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Hunting with a baying dog in Swedish Lapland.

Hunter David Carsten Pedersen speaks about his impressions with the hunting guide Tommy and the baying dog Tiko in swedish Lapland. Tommy has been a guide

in Lapland for many years, and is an expert in the ancient skill of hunting moose over baying dogs.

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Impressions by David Carsten Pedersen.

Working with a baying dog is quite different than hunting with any other dog. We have probably hunted like that since the stone age, and the relation between the hunter and his dog is very strong. These days, the dogs are fitted

with a GPS to track their movements and help the hunters locate the barking. Once it’s located, you start stalking until you are within range, using the sound of the barks to camouflage your steps.

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The passionate hunter Thomas Nohl turned his passion into a profession and at the same time brought a family tradition into the fourth generation.

His parents – a cutler and a goldsmith – believed that the art of making knives no longer had a future. Although the mother‘s side of the Nohls had been cutlers in Gießen for

more than 150 years. So Thomas Nohl completed his training as a retail salesman after graduating in order to be able to continue the family business at least.

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Boar hunting in the Schoenbuch.

In Schoenbuch, south of Stuttgart, there are three primeval forests in which nature is allowed to take its course. Ancient oaks and beech trees reach into the sky, some of these are more than 300 years old.

The Dukes and Kings of Wuerttemberg once hunted here – the most beautiful forest in the country. The starting point of many hunts though was the monastery of Bebenhausen.

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Expanding the horizon at the edge of Europe.

Under the guidance of the Norwegian long-range specialist Thomas Haugland, a small team of highly skilled shooters tested the limits of what is possible on the uninhabited

island group of Vesterålen. Changing winds, rain, steep terrain, and distances of 500 to 800 meters challenged the hunters.

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