Tag Archives: Makro-Planar T* 2/100

Kunito Imai is fond of animals and plants. In and around Tokyo he regularly searches out a small area of nature that he can capture in pictures using ZEISS lenses. His motifs reflect the changing light of the seasons. Portraits of primates, still lifes of flower petals, alluring macro photos — for Imai it is the haiku, the Japanese short poetry form, that forms the common element.


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Like many photographers, the Golden Gate Bridge is one Matt Walker’s most popular motifs. When the fog lies low in the bay of San Francisco he’s off, searching for the best spot from which to capture the lights of the Golden Gate Bridge in the far distance – especially at dusk and at night. And with his ZEISS lenses in tow, he produces impressive images every time.

D800, Distagon T* 2/35, f/16, 67 s, ISO 100
"Morning Glory”: View of the Marin Headlands and Golden Gate Bridge. In the background: San Francisco
Full resolution on Flickr

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A clear night sky has always appealed to Loscar Numael. No smog and no light pollution — conditions you will only find outside in nature. When Numael points his ZEISS lenses at the sky — toward the Milky Way above California, for example, or the Northern Lights  he loses himself in another world. With fascinating photographic results.

D800E, Distagon T* 2,8/15, f/2.8, 23, ISO 6400
„Existence“: Northern Lights above Tombstone Territorial Park, Yukon, Northwest Canada
Full resolution on Flickr

Around four years ago, Loscar Numael was gripped: during a trip to Oregon (USA) he experimented for the first time with taking landscape images at night. He liked the results so much that night photography has been a fixed element in his photographic adventures ever since. During these trips he always takes five ZEISS lenses with him. He entered the “world of ZEISS” around five years go. He used his first ZEISS optic — a head loupe needed for his studies. From there it was just a small step to the Distagon T* 2,8/21, whose precision thrilled him so much that he gradually came to augment his photo gear exclusively with ZEISS lenses: the Distagon T* 2/35, the Makro-Planar T* 2/50, the Makro-Planar T* 2/100 and finally the Distagon T* 2,8/15.

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Lars Müller has always had a fascination for optics and its practical applications. He first trained as an optician, and is a qualified optometrist. Now, as regional sales manager at ZEISS for Berlin/Potsdam, he is responsible for the distribution of testing devices and lenses to opticians. In addition, he regularly studies the "natural optics" of the human eye. As a keen amateur photographer, he relies on the Makro-Planar T* 2/100, and was recently given an opportunity to try out the new Otus 1.4/55.

D800, Otus 1.4/55, f/1.4, 1/20, ISO 100
Pedestrian subway at the International Congress Center (ICC) Berlin
Full resolution on Flickr

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Ming Thein is a true professional behind the camera, even though he found his vocation rather late. After receiving a master’s degree in physics when he was only 16, and followed by a successful career in business, Ming Thein became a full-time photographer in 2011. Today, 26-year old Ming Thein likes to spend time eating – and taking photographs of food for his clients. Ming lives in his native Malaysia and praises the country’s “unbelievable diversity of dishes.” That variety also applies to his choice of equipment. From Ming Thein’s many lenses, he uses his ZEISS Makro-Planar T* 2/100 and ZEISS Distagon T* 2/28 most frequently in his food photography.

D800E, ZEISS Makro-Planar T* 2/100 (f/22, 8, ISO 100)
Three Apples

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Dorthe Peperkorn, a student at the Photo + Medienforum Kiel, received the opportunity to test ZEISS lenses and interpret the pre-determined motto ‘travel photography’ in her own special way.

Dorthe Peperkorn knows all about story logic: for ten years she was a script girl in the film business. “In that role you’re responsible for ensuring good transitions between scenes. You have to make sure that all footage and text transitions are coherent and that the visual continuity in the plot remains intact,” she explains. That experience is also reflected in her photography, which follows a strict logic. For her photo series about a lighthouse on the Elbe River, she applied the principle of juxtaposing wide spaces and nearness, calm and drama.

ZEISS Distagon T* 2,8/21 (f/11, 300, ISO 100)
ZEISS Distagon T* 2,8/21 (f/11, 300, ISO 100)

The photo series begins with a total view, in which the lighthouse is still very much in the background. The image was taken with the ZEISS Distagon T* 2.8/21. The view of the river, fields and trees “plays” with the different tints of black and white. “I am mainly a landscape photographer,” says Peperkorn, “and work very seldom with color. Black and white sharpens the focus; you get closer to the subject. When I take pictures, I always translate the landscape in my head into black and white beforehand.” In her lighthouse series, the contrast between black and white also reveals itself in the opposing moods of the lighthouse scenes.  The long time exposure emphasized the calmness of the landscape, which however quickly shifted and turned out to be the calm before the storm during that photo session. ...continue reading

Swiss photographer Fabian Oefner experiments with color photography to capture the unseen wonders of natural phenomena

Fabian Oefner started experimenting with photography already at a young age, turning his bedroom into a laboratory and shooting at cans of drink so that he could take photographs of them exploding. Though his parents were not always thrilled about his experiments back then, these days Oefner makes a living from them – as an art photographer. He depicts everyday physical phenomena with the aid of color, blending the boundaries between the worlds of art and science to create something new.

Liquid Jewel No. 01, Makro-Planar T* 2/100 (ISO125, f/6.3, 1.3 sec.)
Liquid Jewel No. 01, Makro-Planar T* 2/100 (ISO125, f/6.3, 1.3 sec.)

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Breathtaking shots of glaciers, deserts, oceans, and canyons – in his pictures, Slovakian photographer Filip Kulisev (Master QEP, FBIPP), winner of several international photography prizes, captures the most beautiful places on the planet. Wide-angle lenses, such as the new ZEISS Distagon T* 2,8/15, accompany him on his tours into the wilderness.

Aurora borealis near Tromsoe, Norway, by Filip Kulisev (Distagon T* 2,8/15; f/3.2; 30 sec.; ISO-400)
Aurora borealis near Tromsoe, Norway, by Filip Kulisev.

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