Tag Archives: Distagon T* 2.8/21

David Bumann reveals mountains in the darkness of night and in the bright glow of pyrotechnics and light effects. His images, taken with long exposure times and often a great deal of effort, are both unusual and impressive. And he captures them with ZEISS lenses.

Look at David Bumann‘s pictures and you think of photo montage: Brightly lit snow fields — in the middle of the night? Illuminated railroad bridges — in remote valleys? But that impression deceives. The the snow fields and bridges really are lit up.

EOS 5D Mark II, Distagon T* 2,8/21, f/5,6, 10 sec, ISO 100
Allalin: Saas-Fee, October 30, 2011, 00:15, illuminated with spotlights from the Saas-Fee cableways
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Like many photographers, the Golden Gate Bridge is one Matt Walker’s most popular motifs. When the fog lies low in the bay of San Francisco he’s off, searching for the best spot from which to capture the lights of the Golden Gate Bridge in the far distance – especially at dusk and at night. And with his ZEISS lenses in tow, he produces impressive images every time.

D800, Distagon T* 2/35, f/16, 67 s, ISO 100
"Morning Glory”: View of the Marin Headlands and Golden Gate Bridge. In the background: San Francisco
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A clear night sky has always appealed to Loscar Numael. No smog and no light pollution — conditions you will only find outside in nature. When Numael points his ZEISS lenses at the sky — toward the Milky Way above California, for example, or the Northern Lights  he loses himself in another world. With fascinating photographic results.

D800E, Distagon T* 2,8/15, f/2.8, 23, ISO 6400
„Existence“: Northern Lights above Tombstone Territorial Park, Yukon, Northwest Canada
Full resolution on Flickr

Around four years ago, Loscar Numael was gripped: during a trip to Oregon (USA) he experimented for the first time with taking landscape images at night. He liked the results so much that night photography has been a fixed element in his photographic adventures ever since. During these trips he always takes five ZEISS lenses with him. He entered the “world of ZEISS” around five years go. He used his first ZEISS optic — a head loupe needed for his studies. From there it was just a small step to the Distagon T* 2,8/21, whose precision thrilled him so much that he gradually came to augment his photo gear exclusively with ZEISS lenses: the Distagon T* 2/35, the Makro-Planar T* 2/50, the Makro-Planar T* 2/100 and finally the Distagon T* 2,8/15.

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Spain is teeming with architectural masterpieces from the Middle Ages, the early and later Gothic periods, as well as works of well-known 19th and early 20th century architects.  There is also plenty of modern 21st century architecture to make a photographer’s heart beat a little faster.  When David Aguado photographs these jewels, ZEISS lenses are among his most important companions.

5D Mark II, Distagon T* 2/35, f/2, 1/250, ISO 800
Historic façade in the old city of Salamanca
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Gunnar Eichweber sat in a kayak even before he could walk – and at around the same age, he looked at other people through a camera for the first time. Today he is a student at the photo + media forum (FMF) in Kiel, Germany, and plans to make photography his profession. In a new photo series, which was taken with the help of a ZEISS lens, he combines both passions to create a photographic portrait of a long-distance paddler.

f/2.8, 1/2000; ISO 200
f/2.8, 1/2000; ISO 200

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Dorthe Peperkorn, a student at the Photo + Medienforum Kiel, received the opportunity to test ZEISS lenses and interpret the pre-determined motto ‘travel photography’ in her own special way.

Dorthe Peperkorn knows all about story logic: for ten years she was a script girl in the film business. “In that role you’re responsible for ensuring good transitions between scenes. You have to make sure that all footage and text transitions are coherent and that the visual continuity in the plot remains intact,” she explains. That experience is also reflected in her photography, which follows a strict logic. For her photo series about a lighthouse on the Elbe River, she applied the principle of juxtaposing wide spaces and nearness, calm and drama.

ZEISS Distagon T* 2,8/21 (f/11, 300, ISO 100)
ZEISS Distagon T* 2,8/21 (f/11, 300, ISO 100)

The photo series begins with a total view, in which the lighthouse is still very much in the background. The image was taken with the ZEISS Distagon T* 2.8/21. The view of the river, fields and trees “plays” with the different tints of black and white. “I am mainly a landscape photographer,” says Peperkorn, “and work very seldom with color. Black and white sharpens the focus; you get closer to the subject. When I take pictures, I always translate the landscape in my head into black and white beforehand.” In her lighthouse series, the contrast between black and white also reveals itself in the opposing moods of the lighthouse scenes.  The long time exposure emphasized the calmness of the landscape, which however quickly shifted and turned out to be the calm before the storm during that photo session. ...continue reading

“My mind thinks and dreams in light,” says JanLeonardo Woellert about his art. The light photographer and pyrotechnician is out and about almost every night.  Whether out in the wilds or in unusual buildings, he tirelessly seeks out spectacular subjects and transforms them by using a range of LED light sources and existing light. His choreographed movement patterns create new, mysterious worlds.

Orange World – the bathhouse of the Beelitz-Heilstätten sanatorium. Taken with the Distagon T* 2,8/21.
Orange World – the bathhouse of the Beelitz-Heilstätten sanatorium. Taken with the Distagon T* 2,8/21.

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Hans Strand has earned a reputation as the most ‘poetic’ of landscape photographers. His images are works of art. And yet the 56-year-old, who has won numerous international awards, came to professional photography rather late in life. In this interview he discusses his career path, visual language, and love of ZEISS lenses.

Hans Strand: “Hovs Hallar, in the south of Sweden, has a very rugged coastline with granite cliffs. The evening this photo was shot the weather was very unstable. Rain showers came and left throughout the evening. In this image the sun is just breaking through the rain clouds and lights up the landscape in front of me. The super-wide Distagon T* 2,8/15 allowed me to get everything I wanted in the frame. I used f11 to give me a great depth of field.” (Distagon T* 2.8/15; F/11; 1/5 sec.; ISO-100).
Hans Strand: “Hovs Hallar, in the south of Sweden, has a very rugged coastline with granite cliffs. The evening this photo was shot the weather was very unstable. Rain showers came and left throughout the evening. In this image the sun is just breaking through the rain clouds and lights up the landscape in front of me. The super-wide Distagon T* 2,8/15 allowed me to get everything I wanted in the frame. I used f11 to give me a great depth of field.”

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Breathtaking shots of glaciers, deserts, oceans, and canyons – in his pictures, Slovakian photographer Filip Kulisev (Master QEP, FBIPP), winner of several international photography prizes, captures the most beautiful places on the planet. Wide-angle lenses, such as the new ZEISS Distagon T* 2,8/15, accompany him on his tours into the wilderness.

Aurora borealis near Tromsoe, Norway, by Filip Kulisev (Distagon T* 2,8/15; f/3.2; 30 sec.; ISO-400)
Aurora borealis near Tromsoe, Norway, by Filip Kulisev.

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