News

With the new Loxia 2/35 and Loxia 2/50 lenses, ZEISS combines maximum image quality with classic ease of use for E-mount full-frame cameras. During photokina, which will take place in Cologne from September 16 to 21, photography enthusiasts can see and try out this new family of lenses for the first time.

Loxia 2/50 without lens hood

Loxia 2/50 without lens hood

“Ever since the Sony Alpha 7/7R/7S helped compact system cameras break through to the full frame, there has been a growing desire for a ‘digital manual focus‘ experience that combines the best of both worlds. With the Loxia 2/35 and Loxia 2/50, which are the first members of a new family of manual focus lenses for the E-mount full frame, ZEISS is ready to exceed those expectations,” said Christophe Casenave, Product Manager with ZEISS Camera Lenses.

The Loxia 2/35 on the Sony Alpha 7R

The Loxia 2/35 on the Sony Alpha 7R

The Loxia lenses offer several key highlights, including optimization for digital sensors and electronic viewfinders, the mechanical aperture setting and – for ambitious videography – the mechanical deactivation of the aperture click stops (de-click).

The Loxia family has been specially optimized for digital sensors and the functions of mirrorless E-mount full-format cameras. An electronic interface transmits lens data (EXIF), but also recognizes focus movements and, if desired, activates the camera’s magnifier function. Moreover, the Loxia lenses enable precise manual focusing and a mechanical setting of the aperture (working-aperture aperture priority). This traditional way of working can express one’s personal photo lifestyle, and open up surprising new creative possibilities to compose the image that go beyond all automation.

Loxia 2/50 application sample

Loxia 2/50 application sample

“If I had to describe Loxia lenses in just one sentence,” according to Christophe Casenave, “I would say, ‘tradition meets modernity’. These lenses have been designed for photographers who enjoy shooting spontaneous scenes, but without giving away the work of composing the image to the camera.”

Thanks to the mechanical deactivation of aperture click stops progressive aperture settings are possible (de-click)

Thanks to the mechanical deactivation of aperture click stops progressive aperture settings are possible (de-click)

Yet photographers are not the only ones who will enjoy the Loxia. Ambitious videographers will have at their disposal the possibility of progressive aperture settings (de-click). This will put a tool with enormous creative potential into their hands thanks to the mechanical deactivation of aperture click stops. The lenses’ precise manual focusing also makes the Loxia suitable for professional video productions.

The Loxia lenses are optimized for digital full-frame sensors, and factor the approx. 2.5 mm thick low-pass and infrared filters in, situated in front of the sensor of the corresponding Sony cameras.

Loxia 2/35 lens scheme

Loxia 2/35 lens scheme

As a Biogon, the optical design of the Loxia 2/35 consists of nine lens elements in six groups. With a full-frame focal length of a moderate wide angle, this lens is a specialist for nature, landscape and architectural photography. Because it has a low minimum object distance of just 0.3 meters, all the advantages of close-ups with an unusual perspective also come to the fore.

Loxia 2/50 lens scheme

Loxia 2/50 lens scheme

The design of the Loxia 2/50, which is based on the famous Planar, has six lens elements in four groups. As a ‘classic’ normal lens, it has a field of view that corresponds to natural eyesight. The Loxia 2/50 therefore reveals all its strengths in many different situations, from travel and family photography to photojournalism and portraiture. And with a minimum working distance of 0.37 meters, it can also be used for close-ups. The Loxia 2/50 is an uncomplicated but at the same time high-quality standard lens that photographers can keep on their camera continuously; this enables them to react flexibly to a wide range of everyday situations.

Loxia 2/35 application sample

Loxia 2/35 application sample

Loxia lenses have ten aperture blades and the aperture is almost circular. The effective isolation of motifs with a low depth of field as well as free-handed photography, even in poor lighting conditions, are just two examples of the many possibilities that both Loxia lenses offer thanks to their high speed of f/2.

The Loxia lenses were intentionally designed to be manual-focus lenses; this makes them extremely compact and therefore a perfect companion for travel and street photography. An important advantage in this respect, especially for photographers who work in these disciplines, is that they cannot be recognized right away as professionals. Using the Loxia lenses, they can capture completely true-to-life situations, without attracting attention.

The Loxia 2/35 in detail: weather sealing, e-mount, lens interface

The Loxia 2/35 in detail: weather sealing, e-mount, lens interface

The lenses offer a high resolution across the entire image field and — especially at the maximal aperture opening of f/2 — a harmonious bokeh in the background. The superb mechanical quality that ZEISS lenses are known for can also be found in the Loxia family. The smooth focus operation, with a large focus rotation angle of approximately 180 degrees, allows for the finest variations in focusing. The filter diameter is a consistent M52 across the entire lens family. The robust barrel, made entirely of metal, can withstand the rough everyday situations that professional photographers work in and ensures a long product life. In addition, the lenses have a special weather sealing at the lens mount to prevent spray water from getting between the camera and the lens.

Loxia 2/35 without lens hood

Loxia 2/35 without lens hood

More application samples can be found on Flickr:

Loxia 2/35

Loxia 2/50

Loxia 2/50 as well as Loxia 2/35 come with lens shade, user manual, test certificate, lens caps and de-click tool.

The Loxia 2/50 will be available worldwide starting October 2014 and the Loxia 2/35 from the end of the fourth quarter of 2014. The recommended retail price of the Loxia 2/35 will be EUR 965.55* (US$ 1,299.00)* (excl. VAT) and that of the Loxia 2/50 will be EUR 713.45* (US$ 949.00)* (excl. VAT).

* Status September 2, 2014

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43 Comments

  1. Ben

    Bokeh of the 35/2 looks busy, similar to ZM 35/2. Is the corner smearing fixed, since ZM lens had bad smearing on Sony cameras?

    Reply
  2. petr jehlik

    Well, these are really nice. Small form but big performance.
    From what I just read in technical sheets, both of them are more-or-less improved version of ZM series lenses. Optical layout seems rafined and namely Planar is dramaticaly improved in distortion correction. Chromatical aberration is not presented, so there’s no data for comparisson (maybe this could be aded in future updates of data sheets / for example Rodenstock publish this characteristic in a nice way..)

    All in all – bravo!

    Reply
    1. ZEISS Camera Lenses

      Post author

      Dear Phil,

      Thanks for your question. However, please understand that we cannot comment on possible future products.

      Best regards,
      Your ZEISS Lenses Team

      Reply
  3. Pingback:

  4. Interesting lenses – it is very nice to finally see real weather sealing with rubber around bayonnet in a Sony mount – nice job Zeiss! The price tag is jaw-dropping though – on the other hand people pay sometimes even more for similar lenses from other legendary manufacturers ;) One question – how does the Loxia 50/2 compare to SEL 55/1.8?

    Reply
    1. ZEISS Camera Lenses

      Post author

      Dear Jakub,

      Thanks for your kind words and your question. The Loxia 2/50 is a complete different lens than the Sonnar T* FE 1.8/55. It is more optimized for smoothness than for contrast at high aperture.

      Best regards,
      Your ZEISS Lenses Team

      Reply
    1. ZEISS Camera Lenses

      Post author

      Dear Wim,

      Thanks for your kind words. Looking forward to meeting you at photokina!

      Best regards,
      Your ZEISS Lenses Team

      Reply
  5. Matthew

    Well, this is disappointing. Don’t get me wrong. I love Zeiss lenses. My 21 2.8 for Canon is my favorite lens I have ever owned and is frequently used on my A7r. I sold my Zeiss ZMs when making the full commitment to my A7r as a landscape photographer, because they just didn’t perform well on the A7r. From that perspective, the FE lens lineup has a giant gaping hole in true wide angles, below 35mm. Most A7r owners are landscape photographers and want high quality Zeiss wide angle lenses. I would have pre-ordered any 18, 21, 24 wide angles the moment I could, or an 85mm. But having already invested in the FE/Zeiss 35 and 50, I just don’t see myself ordering these. Zeiss, you could have created compelling wide angles, that pretty much every A7r owner would have ordered. These two I’m sure are the usual Zeiss quality, but they just aren’t compelling since you matched the only two FE primes that exist, instead of filling needs in wide angle or 85. I love Ziess, but you missed an opportunity!

    Reply
    1. Lockwood

      Consider that Sony as such lenses on their own roadmap. One has to surmise that there is an agreement between Sony and Zeiss as to what will be developed and when. Yes?

      Reply
      1. MatthewwMatthew

        I hope if there is an agreement between Sony and Zeiss, that it does not require Zeiss to only offer focal lengths that Sony has already released, so Zeiss doesn’t steal Sony’s thunder. Considering the painfully slow progression of Sony’s lens roadmap, it will take years to see a full Zeiss lineup! But considering that Sony knows the biggest knock on the FE system is lack of a full lens lineup, I would think they would welcome Zeiss filling holes Sony won’t for some time. I guess I’ll have to hope the FE wide zoom is good enough, though it won’t have the Zeiss rendering I love. And I recognize that I am one niche of photographer, which is landscape. But I also know many landscape photographers, who I feel are the primary users of the A7r, and Zeiss wides would be compelling and absolutely sell. If these two less compelling lenses don’t sell fast out of the gate, I don’t want them to think the Loxia line will not do well and not invest in other lenses. Oh well, I am fine with carrying my EF 21 2.8 for now. One big lens that has such great rendering is still worth it.

        Reply
      2. ZEISS Camera Lenses

        Post author

        Dear Lockwood,

        Loxia lenses are solitary developed by ZEISS. They are totally different lenses for different applications than the Sony/Zeiss FE type AF lenses. Sony and ZEISS have independent roadmaps for each of those lens lines.

        Best regards,
        Your ZEISS Lenses Team

        Reply
    2. ZEISS Camera Lenses

      Post author

      Dear Matthew,

      There will definitely be additional focal lengths in the Loxia family of lenses. However, right now we cannot go into more details. But we’ll keep you posted on our ususal channels.

      Best regards,
      Your ZEISS Lenses Team

      Reply
    3. Halide

      I agree completely. I have enjoyed using the A7, but have been anxious to acquire a good wide angle lens designed specifically for this camera. What a disappointment. I’m wondering now if I will be with this system for the long haul….

      Reply
    1. ZEISS Camera Lenses

      Post author

      Hi Gordonn,

      The Biogon T* 2/35 ZM and Planar T* 2/50 ZM are based on decades of proven optical designs whose roots stretch far back in the history of ZEISS. They combine good value for the money, small size, robustness and a long service life.

      The Loxia 2/35 and Loxia 2/50 build on these proven designs and are adapted for use on modern digital mirrorless full-frame system cameras. As well as the possibility of camera-internal image optimization, the Loxia 2/35 and Loxia 2/50 feature a far shorter minimum object distance than the Biogon T* 2/35 ZM and Planar T* 2/50 ZM: 0.3 m compared to 0.7 m for the Loxia 2/35 and 0.45 m compared to 0.7 m for the Loxia 2/50.

      Best regards,
      Your ZEISS Lenses Team

      Reply
  6. AA

    “The Loxia lenses are optimized for digital full-frame sensors, and incorporate the approx. 2.5 mm thick low-pass and infrared filters in front of the sensor in the corresponding Sony cameras.”
    Does this also means that the MTF published graphs are computed considering also the presence of the sensor filter

    Reply
    1. ZEISS Camera Lenses

      Post author

      Dear AA,

      Thanks for your question. And yes, you’re absolutely right :)

      Best regards,
      Your ZEISS Lenses Team

      Reply
  7. evscltk

    It is quite expensive compared with those 35mm lens available worldwide.
    Do you think the price is set too high that people wont consider to buy it?

    Reply
  8. Ssersgio nietoSeSrgio Nieto

    Move to Sony A7R waiting for new lenses, i have the 35 and 55 and i was waiting for an 85 and wide angles, disappointed to said the least. Wrong move Zeiss

    Reply
    1. ZEISS Camera Lenses

      Post author

      Dear Sergio,

      There will definitely be additional focal lengths in the Loxia family of lenses. However, right now we cannot go into more details. But we’ll keep you posted on our ususal channels.

      Best regards,
      Your ZEISS Lenses Team

      Reply
  9. Another triumph for manufacture over what photographers want. Canon don’t listen, Nikon don’t listen and Sony certainly don’t listen to what the customers want to shoot with. Anybody who can read can see in plain sight what has been happening since the great Sony 7, 7r & 7s launched we’ve been using lenses with adaptors because nobody makes the lenses we want (by and large) to shoot with. I guess we all expected that Zeiss would come out with some great lenses to fill the gap, NO another 35mm and a 50mm, just what we didn’t want or need.
    No doubt in time Zeiss will produce a 24mm and an 85mm maybe even a 135mm, all will be at a premium cost over the first two easy to produce lenses has us suckers hooked on the Zeiss name, me included, maybe.
    Somebody in market research should have noticed what the customs wanted and told the designers.

    Waken up Zeiss you are truly missing the boat.

    ::DS

    Reply
    1. ZEISS Camera Lenses

      Post author

      Dear Douglas,

      There will definitely be additional focal lengths in the Loxia family of lenses. However, right now we cannot go into more details. But we’ll keep you posted on our ususal channels.

      Best regards,
      Your ZEISS Lenses Team

      Reply
  10. gIANG

    Because the e-mount lens is made for the Sony Alpha 7/7R/7S. Are all e-mount sony cameras compatible with the lense. For example the Sony A5000, which has an e-mount lense.

    Reply
    1. ZEISS Camera Lenses

      Post author

      Dear gIANG!
      The Loxia lenses can also be used on cameras with an APS-C sensor. As this is a full-frame lens, the usable image angle reduces when it is used on a camera with APS-C Sensor (e.g your Sony Alpha 5000). For instance, a standard lens such as the Loxia 2/50 becomes a short tele-lens with a field angle which corresponds approximately to a lens with 75 mm format focal length (crop factor 1.5).
      Best regards
      ZEISS Lenses Team

      Reply
  11. David

    I was considering to use an adapter for my Sony a7r and buy the Zeiss Distagon T 35mm f/2.0 ZF.2 Lens. Does the sharpness of the new 35mm lens compare to that of this lens? Which one would you recommend for sharpness?

    Reply
    1. ZEISS Camera Lenses

      Post author

      Dear David,

      Thanks for your question. We did not perform extensive tests of adapted lenses (e.g. ZF.2 lenses) on a Sony Alpa 7R. This combination would be ok, at f/2 the performance of an SLR lens might be slightly higher across the whole image field than those of compact Biogon lens types on the same camera body.

      Best regards,
      Your ZEISS Lenses Team

      Reply
  12. Doug Wrenn

    Does the hood simply reverse for storage in the camera bag, staying attached to lens? And take your time in getting the wides correct. The critics of this release of standard 35\50mm type lenses forget that Rome was not built in a day. Lenses that last generations never get churned out by impatient people.

    Reply
  13. James

    These are just what I’ve been waiting for to make the jump to A7x system, but will only be useful if, when the manual focus activates magnification, it reverts immediately to full view the moment one stops turning the focus ring, not after the usual 2 seconds on Sony cameras. Could you confirm exactly how this feature works and whether there’s a delay, please? I missed so many moments using an NEX-6 with 2 second delay I gave up and went to a Fuji XT-1 which goes one better and has a brilliant split focus view – the best MF experience since I had my old Leica. I miss FF perspective, though and would go to these lenses on a Sony in a heartbeat if MF is properly implemented.

    Reply
    1. ZEISS Camera Lenses

      Post author

      Dear James,

      This feature just depends on the camera settings: The Sony cameras allow menu settings for 2s, 5s or “never” to return to full view after magnification. When pressing the shutter button halfway during magnification view, the camera will return immediately to full view for frame composition. So this is perfect for quick precise focusing and quick composition. Loxia (and all other lenses) cannot influence those camera features.

      Best regards,
      Your ZEISS Lenses Team

      Reply
  14. Ivan / I have put Leitax adaptors on all of my R lnsees and use them on my D700. If you are prepared to accept stop-down metering (which I am), they are an excellent solution.The combination of the D700′s full frame and Leica lnsees is hard to beat.

    Reply
  15. Dear Zeiss Team,
    I am confused.
    I am a professional who has owned and used probably every camera format and matching lenses.
    I bought a Sony a7r with the intent of using it on the streets. Because my many years of experience
    enables me to think very quickly and every camera I have use in the past on the street has done the job
    until now. I ended up using my Canon 24-70 MKII lens on the sony with an Metabones adaptor.
    I was on assignment in New York where I missed at least 40% of my shots because the camera can’t
    focus on demand. I appreciate manual focus lenses but they can’t match auto focus in a demanding
    situation. Will Zeiss develop a series of auto focus lenses in the future? I assume the problem with
    the focus is a Sony problem that I hope they will address, because until they do I can’t depend on this camera.
    Thank you for “listening”
    John Casado

    Reply
  16. Hi John,

    I can’t talk for Zeiss or Sony, but perhaps the A7s might be better suited to your needs. Having used and owned the A7, A7s and A7r, I can tell you that the AF is a lot better on the A7s. Also an FE lens with OSS is a big help (no adapter)

    Reply
  17. Bernard

    Just a suggestion for a future product. The lens that really needs the manual-focus/manual-aperture treatment is the Touit 12mm. There are no good wide angle lenses available for Super-35 and Super-16 format video cameras (Blackmagic, Digital Bolex, AJA Cion, Sony FS-700), excluding the Master Primes of course that each cost more than a Golf.

    Reply
  18. shawn

    it would be nice if you guys makes this series a full line up , preferably a 25mm a 85mm and a 100mm

    this gives all indie guys a good/reliable alternative for Indie film needs.

    Ill get them all if you guys make it.

    seriously ,A7S is great ! if Loxia set is out, and paired with it, ill be in love !!!!

    Reply

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