A Microscope Transport Box Becomes a Music Instrument

Customer Story

Daniel Rapoport in many ways is an exceptional scientist. In his research at the Fraunhofer Research Institution for Marine Biotechnology (EMB) in Luebeck, Germany, he already had access to a wide variety of ZEISS microscopes. But when we delivered a ZEISS Xradia Versa X-ray microscopy system to the EMB and Daniel saw the huge wooden transport box, he had a very special idea of what to do with it.

Daniel Rapoport is leading the EMB’s research group for Cell Technology where he specializes in the development of hydrogels for cell cultures. While these hydrogels are well suited for all kinds of cell culture techniques they have one important drawback: 3D imaging with light or confocal microscopy is virtually impossible due to the optical properties of the hydrogel and the cells growing tightly packed inside. But at ZEISS we always strive to ‘make it visible’, no matter how difficult the object and application is. Enter X-ray microscopy: ZEISS Xradia X-ray microscopy systems are perfect imaging systems for 3D visualizations of all kinds of samples where optical instruments come to their limits, so we delivered a ZEISS Xradia Versa to the EMB.

Cells in a hydrogel, imaged with ZEISS Xradia Versa. Courtesy Fraunhofer EMB, Daniel Rapoport.
Cells in a hydrogel, imaged with ZEISS Xradia Versa. Courtesy Fraunhofer EMB, Daniel Rapoport.

This is where the story could have ended: Daniel Rapoport and the scientists at the Fraunhofer EMB have a new amazing instrument that boosts their research, they can finally visualize all kinds of samples at impressive resolution in 3D, and offer their services to partners from science and industry. But when Daniel saw the huge transport box where the precious instrument came in, with all of its ZEISS logos and transport writings, he had a special idea about how to best recycle the box.

ZEISS Xradia transport box at Fraunhofer EMB. Courtesy of Daniel Rapoport.
ZEISS Xradia transport box at Fraunhofer EMB. Courtesy of Daniel Rapoport.

A musician himself, Daniel knows a lot about electric guitars, particularly the most iconic instruments such as the Fender Stratocaster, the Telecaster, or the Gibson Les Paul. He already had experience in guitar building, so he created a first vector drawing based on the iconic Les Paul design, and he and his team started working on the first ZEISScaster ever!

Vector drawing of the ZEISScaster for the wood cutting
Vector drawing of the ZEISScaster for the wood cutting

The team selected the best-fitting parts from the transport box and began to cut out 5 plies of wood for the hollow corpus that were glued together and fitted with all the necessary parts including a Tronical auto-tuning system (remember, it’s a ZEISScaster, it has to be special!). Work progress is shown in the following photos:

The 5 plies of cut-out wood that will form the ZEISScaster corpus
The 5 plies of cut-out wood that will form the ZEISScaster corpus
Gluing the ZEISSCaster corpus
Gluing the ZEISSCaster corpus

The impressive result is the world-first, completely unique and most probably totally awesome ZEISScaster electric guitar as shown in the next photos. We congratulate Daniel for his new instrument, and if he records a “Stairway to Heaven” with the instrument we’ll make sure to share it here with you!

 

Do you have similar very special moments with ZEISS, or do you have more ideas how to most creatively recycle our transport boxes? Share them with us in the comments section!

 

Register for the 6th Annual Meeting – Industrial Cell Technology – Symposium at the Fraunhofer EMB in Lübeck!

 

Interested in X-ray microscopy systems by ZEISS? Click here and get in contact! 

ZEISS rocks!

Front of the ZEISScaster
Front of the ZEISScaster
Back of the ZEISScaster
Back of the ZEISScaster
Daniel Rapoport with his new favourite instrument
Daniel Rapoport with his new favourite instrument

Tags: X-ray Microscopy

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