Imaging Biological Samples – a Reference List

Knowledge

In Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM), the detection beam path is placed perpendicular to the illumination beam path. By these means a fluorescently labeled sample is illuminated from the side, using laser light that is formed into a thin sheet of light, exciting only fluorophores within the focal plane of the detection objective. Thus all fluorescent signal can be collected on a camera-based detector. This unique setup allows for extremely light efficient optical sectioning and unprecedented imaging speed, causing only minimal phototoxicity or bleaching. Image acquisition with high spatial and temporal resolution over long periods of time becomes a feasible task.

The light sheet is projected onto the sample form the side (A), i.e. perpendicular to the optical axis of the detection lens, hence illuminating the microscope’s entire focal plane. (B) The light sheet is generated either statically using a cylindrical lens or dynamically by high-frequency scanning of a laser beam. (Taken from Olaf Selchow and Jan Huisken, 2013)
The light sheet is projected onto the sample form the side (A), i.e. perpendicular to the optical axis of the detection lens, hence illuminating the microscope’s entire focal plane. (B) The light sheet is generated either statically using a cylindrical lens or dynamically by high-frequency scanning of a laser beam. (Taken from Olaf Selchow and Jan Huisken, 2013)

ZEISS Lightsheet Z.1 offers a horizontal LSFM setup, in which a sample is suspended from above and placed into a liquid-filled sample chamber, providing the sample with environmentally (temperature, medium) stable conditions over long periods of time. Additionally, the sample can be rotated in front of the detection objective to image from the perfect angle or to combine different viewing perspectives into one dataset, known as Multiview imaging. The many advantages of Lightsheet Z.1 have been used by scientists of different specialties to advance their research. Imaging live specimens clearly benefits from the combination of advantages LSFM offers. Therefore, many publications featuring Lightsheet Z.1 are reporting in vivo imaging of whole organisms (e.g. model organism in developmental biology) or three-dimensional cell and tissue cultures. Even fixed and chemically cleared tissues, such as whole mouse brains, also make use of the fast, sensitive and stable imaging conditions of Lightsheet Z.1.

Principle of light sheet fluorescence microscopy with ZEISS Lightsheet Z.1
Principle of light sheet fluorescence microscopy with ZEISS Lightsheet Z.1

A new Application Note details the published research using ZEISS Lightsheet Z.1 over the past three years. This reference list shows the vast opportunities of a multi-purpose LSFM within different areas of research. These include scientific publications in cell culture and in vitro imaging, clearing applications, plant imaging, whole organism in vivo imaging, and image processing.

Download the Application Note with reference list here!

Don’t miss the EMBO Practical Course on Light Sheet Microscopy #EMBO_LISH2016 from 15 – 26 August 2016 in Dresden!

Eager to know how Lightsheet Z.1 can boost your research? Visit the website and get in contact with our specialists!

 

Further reading:

 

Tags: Light sheet Microscopy

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